ENGL 330: Medieval British Literature (ca. 450-1485)

Fall 2020 Calendar of Assignments

  • Synchronous Class Meetings over Zoom: W/F 8:10-10:00 AM
  • Virtual Office Hours via Zoom: W 10:10-11:00 AM; Th 12:10-1:00 PM; and by appointment
    (Zoom Links provided via email and on Canvas)
Dr. Debora B. Schwartz 
e-mail: dschwart@calpoly.edu
  • IMPORTANT:  Please BEGIN subject line of ALL emails to me with CLASS NUMBER AND SECTION (203-01)

NOTE:  DO NOT PRINT OUT THIS CALENDAR OF ASSIGNMENTS!! It is intended to be consulted online.  (Print-out would be VERY long, and assignments are subject to change.)  

Week  0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9
10 11

REQUIRED TEXTBOOKS: you MUST use the following textbooks -- not another edition or translation -- in this class.  Required textbooks are listed in the order in which they are used; order NOW to be sure you have them on time!  All of these texts should be available for purchase at the University Bookstore, or you may purchase them from another source (try Bookfinder.com for inexpensive used copies).  Readings in required textbooks are indicated on the Calendar of Assignments using the following abbreviations:

RECOMMENDED TEXTBOOKS:  If you prefer actual books over reading online or printing out .PDF files, inexpensive used copies of the Marie Boroff translations of Pearl and Sir Gawain and the Green Knight used in our class (required readings) are available at the links below. And if you enjoy reading the Marie de France selection in the NA (also a required reading), I recommend picking up a (cheap, used) copy of her complete collection of 12 Lais., available at the links below.

Prior to First Class Meeting 1: Course Expectations; Backgrounds I: Medieval Textuality and Manuscript Culture; Old English Oral Literary Tradition
  • Fill out and return to me AS AN EMAIL ATTACHMENT the ENGL 330 Questionnaire that I have attached to the announcement email.  It is also available under course materials in Canvas.  I will use the information on your questionnaire both to get to know you (a bit) and to assign you to a Canvas Discussion Group to which you will post your lower-stakes (ungraded) writing assignments. 
  • Read completely through the "top layer" of the ENGL 330 Online Syllabus (without following links) and skim this down this calendar of assignments so you have an idea of how the course is organized.  Course information will only be covered briefly in class; you are expected to be aware of the fuller details about assignments and course expectations found on the Online Syllabus.
  • Read through NA 3-10 (on the notion of the "Middle Ages" and on Anglo-Saxon literature); NA 19 (1st paragraph of "Medieval English"); NA 24-26 (Paragraph on Old English Prosody and first page of Texts/Context Timeline.  NOTE:  if you do not yet have your NA, this background information can be found as part of the "Beowulf pt. 1" .PDF file on e-reserve in the Required Readings folder of Canvas; in this file, read NA pp. 1-6 (stop at "Anglo-Norman England), 19 (first paragraph only), and 20 (first part of timeline, to 1066 only).
  • Prepare Day 1 in-class reading:  Bede's Ecclesiastical History of the English People, including transcription of Caedmon's Hymn (headnote and text, NA pp. 29-32 in the textbook, or .PDF on e-reserve in Canvas for the convenience of those who did not yet have the required 9th edition of the Norton Anthology).  Click on link for STUDY GUIDE (which should be printed out and placed in your course binder).

Week 1 (September 16-18)
Day 1 (W 9/16): Course Expectations; Backgrounds I: Latin Manuscript Culture vs. Old English Alliterative Poetry and Oral Literary Traditions (Bede and Caedmon)

I. BRIEF overview of course expectations
(you are expected to have read through the "top layer" of the ENGL 330 Online Syllabus prior to our first class meeting so I can answer questions about course expectations and assignments that require fuller explanation). 

II. Required background readings: 
  • NA 3-10 (Introduction to the "Middle Ages" and to Anglo-Saxon literature); NA 19 (1st paragraph of "Medieval English"); NA 24-26 (Paragraph on Old English Prosody and first page of Texts/Context Timeline).  NOTE:  if you do not yet have your NA, this background information can be found as part of the "Beowulf pt. 1" .PDF file on e-reserve in the Required Readings folder of Canvas; in this file, read NA pp. 1-6 (stop at "Anglo-Norman England), 19 (first paragraph only), and 20 (first part of timeline, to 1066 only).
  • Online reading: Study Guide to Bede's Ecclesiastical History of the English People, including transcription of Caedmon's Hymn; click on link for this STUDY GUIDE which should be printed out and placed in your course binder.
  • Headnote to Bede/Caedmon, the assigned primary (medieval) texts, NA 29 (or at the start of the Bede/Caedmon .PDF on e-reserve in the Required Readings folder on Canvas).
     
III. Required Primary Readings (note that this one NA selection actually contains TWO different medieval texts):
  • Excerpt from Bede's Latin Ecclesiastical History of the English People, NA 29-32.  This excerpt contains Bede's account of an anecdote about Caedmon, but please note that although the NA labels the excerpt "Caedmon's Dream," that "title" refers only to the portion of the Ecclesiastical History printed in the NA -- not to Bede's text as a whole.  
  • "Caedmon's Hymn," an Old English alliterative verse poem by Caedmon that has been incorporated into the excerpt from Bede's Ecclesiastical History that is printed in your NA.
  • NOTE: Page numbers listed above refer to the required textbook, the NA 9th ed.  The .PDF file on e-reserve was scanned from a previous edition, so the .PDF file pagination is different (headnote NA 16-17; Bede's text NA 17-19; text of Caedmon's hymn embedded in Bede's account, NA 17 [bottom] - 18 [top]).
     
Day 2 (F 9/18): Backgrounds II: Anglo-Saxon heroic values in the genres Dream Vision and Epic (Dream of the Rood and Beowulf)

Required Background Readings

  • NA Appendix A41 ("Saxons and Danes" only); NA 32-33 (Headnote to The Dream of the Rood); NA 36-41 (Headnote to Beowulf). NOTE: if you do not yet have your NA 9th ed., these headnotes are found in the .PDFs containing the primary texts, on e-reserve in the required readings folder on Canvas.  (Please note that because the .PDF scans were made from earlier editions of the NA, page numbers in the .PDFs differ from those listed here, which refer to the NA 9th ed.)
  • Online study guides for The Dream of the Rood and Beowulf (click on links to access study guides, which you should print out and place in your course binder)
  • Consult the information on the Epic genre and on "epic conventions" on e-reserve in Canvas (.PDF file, 2 pp.) but don't sweat the details; be aware this Glossary of Literary Terms entry is based on the conventions of classical (Greek and Latin) epics rather than Anglo-Saxon/Germanic ones like Beowulf.  We will see that Dante follows these conventions far more closely than the Beowulf poet(s).  [Print out and place in your course binder.]
  • As necessary, review NA 3-10 (on the notion of the "Middle Ages" and on Anglo-Saxon literature); NA 19 (1st paragraph of "Medieval English"); NA 24-26 (Old and Middle English Prosody and first page of Texts/Context Timeline)
     
Required Primary Readings (medieval texts): 
  • The Dream of the Rood, two translations:  Alfred David's alliterative verse translation, found in the 9th ed. of the NA, pp.  33-36, AND Donaldson's prose translation scanned from the 8th edition and on e-reserve in Canvas (.PDF file, 5 pp; for your convenience, this file contains BOTH translations.)  PRINT OUT THESE TRANSLATIONS AND INCLUDE IN YOUR COURSE BINDER.  We will begin our discussion by comparing the two translations, but thereafter we will use only the PROSE translation which better conveys the structure of the poem.  You will need hard copy access to BOTH translations during the synchronous class meeting.  
    NOTE: if you write ME 1 on Dream of the Rood, you must use the PROSE TRANSLATION from the .PDF file, not the verse translation in the textbook.
  • Beowulf 1 (Beginning and Grendel episodes, up to "The Dragon Wakes"), NA 41-88. (NOTE: if you don't yet have your copy of the NA 9th edition, these portions of the poem are found in the first two Beowulf files on e-reserve in the required readings portion of Canvas.)
     
Recommended Background Reading:
  • W. F. Bolton, "The Conditions of Literary Composition in Medieval England" (.PDF file, 15 pp., on e-reserve under Recommended Readings in Canvas).  Click HERE for a Study Guide directing you to the most important points in the Bolton reading.
NOTE 1:  Ideally, background readings should be read prior to assigned primary readings (the medieval texts).  If you are short on time this week, read the headnotes to the two medieval primary texts and the assigned portions of these medieval texts.  You can catch up on the other assigned background readings over the week-end.
NOTE 2: It is strongly recommended that you print out required online readings (including Study Guides) and keep them in a binder which you bring with you to class.
NOTE 3:  Don't forget to fill out and return your First-Day Questionnaire!
 
Week 1 (Anglo-Saxon/Old English) Text info:
  • Bede's Ecclesiastical History of the English People is a Latin prose history (or "chronicle"), completed in 731, a few years before the death of the Venerable Bede in 735.  It focuses on  the (re-)Christianization of post-Anglo-Saxon-Conquest Britain, in particular the spread of Christianity in England and the growth of the English Church.
  • Caedmon's "Hymn" is the earliest poem in Old English which has been preserved.  It was composed orally in Old English alliterative verse by an illiterate cowherd named Caedmon some time between 658 and 680 (i.e. either before Bede's birth, ca. 673, or when Bede was still a small child).  The Old English text was not written down at the time of its oral composition, but it has been preserved written in the margins of Bede's Ecclesiastical History adjacent to his Latin translation of the hymn.
  • The Dream of the Rood is an orally composed Dream Vision in Old English alliterative verse created by an unknown author some time between the 8th and 10th centuries.  Preserved in a single manuscript.
  • Beowulf is an orally composed Epic in Old English alliterative verse created by an unknown author some time between the 8th and 10th centuries. Preserved in a single manuscript.
  • Alliterative Verse was the form for ALL Old English (Anglo-Saxon era) poetry.  The alliterative line does not contain a fixed number of syllables, but it typically contains four stressed syllables. The alliterative line is separated into two half lines by a pause in the middle called a medial caesura; each half line contains two stressed syllables. Typically, the first three stressed syllables (but not the fourth) alliterate with each other, i.e., they begin with the same sound (either a consonant sound or a vowel/H).
     
LOOKING AHEAD 1: Out-of-class writing assignment. Ungraded ME 1 (a two-page Mini-Essay on Dream of the Rood or Beowulf) is due to your assigned Canvas Mini-Essay Discussion Group no later than MIDNIGHT on Sunday, 9/27/20.   Required Classmate Responses must be submitted by MIDNIGHT on Tuesday, 9/29/20, as replies to MEs posted by TWO members of your discussion group.
  • Prior to writing ME 1, carefully read the guidelines for Discussion Group Mini-Essays and Classmate ResponsesYou must FOLLOW THESE GUIDELINES  to receive credit for ungraded Discussion Group assignments.
  • To receive credit for ME 1, you must post two short Classmate Responses as replies to TWO MEs posted by other members of your assigned discussion group.  Each Classmate Response must include additional textual support from the medieval text (i.e. a passage not quoted in Mini-Essay to which you are responding).  These two classmate responses are due to your Discussion Group no later than midnight on Monday, 9/28/20.
     
LOOKING AHEAD 2 ("STUDY QUIZ" 1):
  • Your completed "STUDY QUIZ 1" must be FULLY filled out and emailed to Dr. Schwartz as either a .docx file or a scanned .PDF document by midnight on MONDAY, 9/28/20. This OPEN BOOK exercise replaces the objective component of a timed exam; it allows you to demonstrate your grasp of factual knowledge covered in class and your recognition of key passages discussed in lectures. The complete set of "study quizzes" for the quarter will be graded holistically and will together count for 10% of your final course grade.

Week 2  (September 23 - 25)
Day 1 (W 9/23):

1st hour: Beowulf
, conclusion; 2nd hour: the notion of Translatio and Medieval Attitudes towards the Vernacular (Medieval Prologues and Epilogues)

Required Primary Reading (1st hour):
  • Finish reading Beowulf (NA 32-99); discussion will focus on the role of Beowulf's thane Wiglaf and the question of why someone in the Church recorded this decidedly secular story on parchment with ink.  As necessary, review online study guide for Beowulf.
     
Required Background Readings (2nd hour): 
  • "Translatio studii et imperii" (check out the images on the linked page, but print out the text-only .PDF file, 2 pp., on e-reserve in Canvas).  NOTE: Online version is used in lecture but should not be printed out because the images obscure the text (and would make print-outs very long).  Print out the text-only version on e-reserve, put it in your course binder, and have it with you during virtual class meeting.
  • Medieval Attitudes Towards the Vernacular: Prologues  (click link to access this online reading.  It doubles as your study guide for the set of Primary Readings listed below; be sure to PRINT IT OUT AND BRING WITH YOU TO CLASS.)
     
Required Primary Readings (2nd hour):
  • Prologues to Chrétien de Troyes's Erec and Enide and Cligés (in Arthurian Romances, the first two paragraphs on pp. 37 and 123). If you do not yet have your copy of this required textbook, you may access these prologues in  PRINT OUT AND PUT IN YOUR COURSE BINDER, which you should have with you during the virtual class meeting.
  • Marie de France, prologue and epilogue to the Fables and prologue to the Lais (.PDF file, 8 pp., on e-reserve in Canvas. PRINT OUT AND PUT IN YOUR COURSE BINDER, which you should have with you during the virtual class meeting.
Day 2 (F 9/25): The Anglo-Norman Period: Beginnings of Written Vernacular Literature in England (NOTE: the language of this medieval literature is Anglo-Norman FRENCH, not Old English);

[As necessary, complete discussion of material assigned for last class meeting.]

Required Background and Primary Readings:


Required Primary Readings:

  • Excerpts from Geoffrey of Monmouth, Wace and Layamon (NA 130-131).  BRING NA OR PHOTOCOPY OF THESE PAGES WITH YOU TO CLASS.
Recommended Readings:
  • If you have time, SKIM Excerpts from Virgil's Aeneid and the anonymous Anglo-Norman Romance of Eneas (.PDF files are on e-reserve in Recommended Readings folder of Canvas).
Week 2 Text info:
  • A "Prologue" refers to an opening statement made by an author at the beginning of his or her narrative, before the beginning of the story itself.  Medieval authors typically used Prologues (and Epilogues, statements found at the end of a narrative, after the conclusion of the story itself) to talk about what they have written, to explain what they are trying to do, and to stake a claim to literary legitimacy.  Prologues and Epilogues may also be used by authors to dedicate a work to a potential "patron,"  a rich and powerful person whom they hope will reward them for the honor, either financially or by offering them protection or prestige.
  •  "Romance" originally meant any narrative in the French language (romans was the Old French term for the French language because French is derived from Latin, the language of the Romans).  Over time, it came to refer to a specific type of narrative, or  genre: a fictional story which typically has a long-ago-and-far-away setting, aristocratic characters, plots involving both love and warfare, and a happy ending. As a genre, romances often draw on the conventions of courtly love, depicting lovers who suffer from love sickness and express their feelings in flowery speeches.  A common plot line involves an adventure where the hero's chivalric prowess is inspired by or enhanced by his love for a lady (who may be unhappily married, imprisoned or persecuted, or whom he may win as a bride through his chivalric prowess).
  • A lai is a short fictional narrative genre in octosyllabic rhyming couplets (the form of all 12th-century French literary texts).  These vernacular poems typically focus on the male/female love relationships of courtly (noble) protagonists and usually contain supernatural or fairy-tale elements.

  • Marie de France was active ca. 1160s-1190s at the Anglo-Norman court of King Henry II Plantagenet and Queen Eleanor of Aquitaine (recall that the rulers of England had been French speakers since the Norman Conquest in 1066, when William the Conqueror defeated the English King Harold II in the Battle of Hastings). Marie knew Latin (well) and at least some English, but the works we are reading were written in French. We are reading the Prologue and Epilogue to her collection of Fables, the Prologue to the Lais, and (next week) three lais: "Lanval," "Chevrefoil" and "Guigemar"; "Milun" is also recommended.
  • Chrétien de Troyes was was active ca. 1170-1190 at several courts on the European continent (the courts of France, Champagne and Flanders, but not Anglo-Norman England).  He knew Latin, but the works we are reading were written in French rhyming verse (specifically, octosyllabic rhyming couplets, the verse form typical of 12th-century French vernacular literature)
  • Geoffrey of Monmouth's History of the Kings of England (Historia regum Britanniae) is a (fabricated) chronicle (history) written in Latin prose in 1136 for the Anglo-Norman court.
  • Wace's Romance of Brutus (Roman de Brut) is an Anglo-Norman French translation/adaptation of Geoffrey's Latin chronicle, written in octosyllabic rhyming couplets in 1155 and dedicated to Eleanor of Aquitaine, the queen of England.  Note: the word "romance" in the title merely means that this chronicle is told in the French language, but generically, Wace's text is still a history or chronicle rather than a "romance."
  • Layamon's Brut is a Middle English translation/adaptation of Wace's Romance of Brutus, written ca. 1190 in Middle English alliterative verse.  Like Wace's poem, its genre is chronicle or history rather than "romance."

OPEN-BOOK STUDY "QUIZ 1" (on Anglo-Saxon literature) due via email to Dr. Schwartz as a .docx or .PDF attachment no later than midnight on Monday, 9/28/20.  The complete set of "study quizzes" for the quarter will be graded holistically and will together count for 10% of your final course grade.

OUT OF CLASS WRITING:  Ungraded ME 1 (a two-page Mini-Essay on Dream of the Rood or Beowulf) is due to your assigned Canvas Mini-Essay Discussion Group no later than MIDNIGHT on Sunday, 9/27/20.   Required Classmate Responses must be submitted by MIDNIGHT on Tuesday, 9/29/20, as replies to MEs posted by TWO members of your discussion group.
  • Prior to writing ME 1, carefully read the guidelines for Discussion Group Mini-Essays and Classmate ResponsesYou must FOLLOW THESE GUIDELINES  to receive credit for ungraded Discussion Group assignments.
  • To receive credit for ME 1, you must post short Classmate Responses to TWO MEs posted by other members of your assigned discussion group.  Each Classmate Response must include additional textual support from the medieval text (i.e. a passage not quoted in Mini-Essay to which you are responding).  These two classmate responses are due to your Discussion Group no later than midnight on Tuesday, 9/29/20.
     
BASIC ME GUIDELINES:
  • Your 2-page ME should be grounded in close reading:  this means that your textually based analysis must cite and explain multiple passages from the medieval text to demonstrate the validity of clearly articulated claims about the medieval text.  Rule of thumb: you should quote and analyze at least 2-3 passages from the medieval text in shorter body paragraphs (1/2 page or less in length); weave at least 3-4 quotations from the medieval text into any longer body paragraphs (over 1/2 page in length).  All quotations should be followed by a parenthetical reference containing the page number on which the quote is found (or the inclusive line numbers for verse passages with numbered lines).
  • Because anout-of-class ME replaces in-class exam essays, do NOT simply write whatever strikes your fancy; the goal is to demonstrate your understanding of the medieval text as it was presented in lectures:  why we read it, and how close reading suggests the purpose for which it was created and the message it conveyed to its target audience. 
  • Your Opening paragraph should fully and explicitly articulate the claims (and sub-claims) you are making in your ME; this introduction should also include any background information essential to your argument, including but not limited to date, authorship, target audience, generic conventions, and definitions of terms central to your analysis.
  • Use the ME TEMPLATE available on Canvas to ensure proper formatting of your document and correct documentation of your source.  Be sure to OPEN AND READ the template, as it contains additional pointers on how to write a strong ME.
  • REMINDER: if you choose to write on Dream of the Rood, you must use Donaldson's PROSE TRANSLATION (on e-reserve in Canvas), NOT the verse translation by Alfred David that is printed in your NA; document quotations parenthetically using the page numbers in the .PDF scan.  If you write on Beowulf, you must cite the Seamus Heaney verse translation found in the NA (or the .PDF scan on e-reserve in Canvas); document quotations parenthetically using INCLUSIVE LINE NUMBERS, NOT page numbers in the NA.


ME SUBMISSION GUIDELINES:
  • Save your ungraded ME 1 as a .docx file under the file name "[your Last Name]330ME1_F20.docx" and attach this file to your Canvas Discussion Board posting.   NOTE:  a .docx text is required 1) so that your essay can be added to the database of previously submitted essays used to check for possible cases of plagiarism; and 2) to ensure that I can open and print out the file.
  • CUT AND PASTE the TEXT and WORK CITED (only -- not your personal identifying info or the ME number and title) into the message field of your posting.  Check and correct the formatting.
  • Put the ME number followed by a colon and your ME title on the Subject Line of the posting. (No need to include your last name, as it is already part of your Discussion Forum posting.)

LOOKING AHEAD: OUT OF CLASS PEER-EDITING ASSIGNMENT. You will find posted in your Canvas Discussion Group a chart listing the classmate to whose ME you will provide feedback in the REQUIRED "DRY RUN" (i.e. ungraded) peer editing assignment, due via email to Dr. Schwartz as a .docx or .PDF attachment no later than midnight on Sunday after week 3 (10/4/20).  Full assignment description and submission guidelines are found at the end of the Week 3 assignments as well as on Canvas adjacent to the Essay Evaluation Checklist.


Week 3 (September 30 - October 2)
Day 1 (W 9/30/20):
[As needed, wrap up discussion of readings assigned last week.]


 Literary Love in the 12th Century 1: The Tristan tradition and Marie de France

Required Background Readings:
Required Primary Readings:
  • Marie de France, Lanval and Chevrefoil (NA 154-69; also found in recommended textbook The Lais of Marie de France, trans. Hanning and Ferrante, and on e-reserve in same .PDF file as Guigemar); Marie de France, Guigemar (recommended textbook pp. 30-55; OR pp. 1-16 of 19-page .PDF file [also contains "Chevrefoil"] on e-reserve in Required Readings folder on Canvas).

If you have time . . .  Recommended Primary Readings:
  • Marie de France, "Milun," NA 143-54, and/or additional lais if you purchased the recommended textbook
  • Joseph Bedier's The Romance of Tristan and Iseult, a modern retelling of the medieval legend based upon a compilation of various medieval sources; it is a quick and highly enjoyable read! Find it online from Project Gutenberg (follow link).  

  • From Thomas's fragmentary Romance of Tristan: "The Death of Tristran and Ysolt," printed NA 133-37; a translation of the complete Thomas fragments (in Hatto's translation, as printed in the Penguin Classics text of Gottfried von Strassburg's Tristan) is in a .PDF file, 33 pp., on e-reserve in the Recommended Readngs section of Canvas. 

Day 2 (F 10/2/20):
[As needed, complete discussion of Marie de France and other readings assigned for last class]

New Topic: A 14th-century English Translatio of a Breton Lai: Geoffrey Chaucer, The Franklin's Tale


Required Background Reading: 



Required Primary Readings:
  • Chaucer, two lyric poems, the ballads "Truth" and "Gentilesse" in modern translation (.PDF file, 2pp. on e-reserve in the Required Readings folder on Canvas). NOTE:  if you have a copy of The Portable Chaucer,  you will find these readings pp. 602-4.  Also have a look at the Middle English originals:  "Truth" NA 344-45 and "Gentilesse" (click link to access).
  • From David Wright's modern translation of Geoffrey Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales: the conversation between the Squire, the Franklin, and the Host and The Franklin's Prologue and Tale, pp. 292-316 in the Oxford World Classics ebook (accessible electronically through the Kennedy Library by following the link at leftt -- Cal Poly Portal log-in required -- or as .PDFs on e-reserve on in the Required Readings folder on Canvas).

Week 3 Text Info:
  • Marie de France was active ca. 1160s-1190s at the Anglo-Norman court of King Henry II Plantagenet and Queen Eleanor of Aquitaine (recall that the rulers of England had been French speakers since the Norman Conquest in 1066, when William the Conqueror defeated the English King Harold II in the Battle of Hastings). Marie knew Latin (well) and at least some English, but the works we are reading were written in French. We are reading the Prologue and Epilogue to her collection of Fables, the Prologue to the Lais, and three of her twelve lais: Lanval, Chevrefoil, and Guigemar; Milun is also recommended.
  • Recall that "Romance" originally meant any narrative in the French language (romans was the Old French term for the French language because French is derived from Latin, the language of the Romans).  Over time, it came to refer to a specific type of narrative, or  genre: a fictional story which typically has a long-ago-and-far-away setting, aristocratic characters, plots involving both love and warfare, and a happy ending. As a genre, romances often draw on the conventions of courtly love, depicting lovers who suffer from love-sickness and express their feelings in flowery speeches.  A common plot line involves an adventure where the hero's chivalric prowess is inspired by or enhanced by his love for a lady (who may be unhappily married, imprisoned or persecuted, or whom he may win as a bride through his chivalric prowess).
  • Geoffrey Chaucer lived ca. 1343-1400.  The Canterbury Tales (taken as a whole) is a "frame narrative" collection on which Chaucer worked during the last 14 years of his life (ca. 1386-1400). A "frame narrative" is a work in which a group of story-tellers tell stories to each other.  The individual stories that they tell are embedded within the narrative framework, which in the case of the Canterbury Tales is a pilgrimage to visit the shrine of St. Thomas à Becket at Canterbury Cathedral.
  • All assigned Canterbury Tales readings were originally in English rhyming couplets in iambic pentameter (ten-syllable lines consisting of 5 iambs, i.e., with an alternating pattern of unstressed and stressed syllables). An "iamb" is a two-syllable unit of verse in which an unstressed syllable is followed by a stressed one; five such two-syllable units form an iambic pentameter line with the stress pattern "da DUM, da DUM, da DUM, da DUM, da DUM."
  • The Franklin's Tale is Chaucer's example of what he calls a "Breton Lai." Like Marie's lais, it is a short narrative poem in rhyming couplets with aristocratic characters, a focus on male-female love relationships, a potential adulterous love affair, and (seemingly) supernatural elements; in Chaucer's poem, however, the supposedly "magical" element turns out to be a combination of 14th-century "science" and trickery rather than true enchantment. 
  • A "Franklin" (literally, a "free man") occupied a social position between (or at the very bottom of ) the "gentry," but above the lower classes. His status is similar to that of the respectable and "well born" gentlemen and ladies who are the main characters in many Jane Austen novels (e.g. the Bennett family in Pride and Prejudice, who are "well born" but worry about money).  His status falls between a landed aristocrat with a great estate (like Mr. Darcy) and a title (a duke, a baron, a lord, a lady); he is also not a commoner, neither a farm laborer nor a middle-class person who must earn a living by practicing a profession (like a merchant, a lawyer, or someone in "trade"). 
  • The Franklin's in-between status -- the very bottom of the aristocratic class, or the very top of the commoners -- resembles that of Chaucer, whose father was a prosperous wine merchant and whose mother was a member of the lowest echelon of the aristocracy. The Franklin is eager to be accepted as a nobleman by the noble classes (hence his "sucking up" to the higher born Squire in the conversation that precedes his Prologue), and his preoccupation, in his tale, with proving that non-nobles (e.g. the Clerk who helps Aurelius) can act as nobly and generously as an aristocrat (like the Knight, Arveragus, and the Squire, Aurelius).

LOOKING AHEAD 1 (OUT OF CLASS WRITING):  Ungraded ME 2 (a two-page Mini-Essay on  is due to your assigned Canvas Mini-Essay Discussion Forum no later than MIDNIGHT on Sunday, 10/18. (Assignment parameters to follow.)

Required Classmate Responses must be submitted by MIDNIGHT on Tuesday, 10/20/20 as replies to MEs posted by TWO members of your discussion group,
  • The printable .docx file copy of your ME 2 attached to your Discussion Group ME 2 posting should include your name, discussion group number, and submission date at top left.    On the title line,  put "ME 2:" followed by your title, which should include (but not simply be) the title of the work(s) and/or author you are writing on.
  • Prior to writing ME 2, carefully read the guidelines for Discussion Board Mini-Essays and Classmate Responses.  You must FOLLOW THESE GUIDELINES (click on the links) to receive credit for Discussion Board assignments.
  • To receive credit for ME 2, you must post TWO short Classmate Responses, each of which must include additional textual support from the medieval text (passages not included in the ME to which you are responding) to each of TWO Mini-Essays posted by other members of your Discussion Board group) no later than MIDNIGHT on Tuesday, 10/20/20.

LOOKING AHEAD 2 ("STUDY QUIZ" 2):
  • Your completed "study quiz 2" must be FULLY filled out and emailed to Dr. Schwartz as a single scanned .PDF document by midnight on Monday, 10/19/20. This OPEN BOOK exercise replaces the objective component of a timed exam; it allows you to demonstrate your grasp of factual knowledge covered in class and your recognition of key passages discussed in lectures. The complete set of "study quizzes" for the quarter will be graded holistically and will together count for 10% of your final course grade.
     


Week 4  (October 7-9) 
Day 1 (W 10/7/20): Arthurian Romance 1: Sir Gawain and the Green Knight

[As needed, complete discussion of Marie de France and Chaucer's "Breton Lai," The Franklin's Tale]

Required Background Readings:
Required Primary Readings:
  • Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, in Marie Borroff’s translation, available in two .PDF files on e-reserve in Canvas.  NOTE: this REQUIRED TRANSLATION is NOT the less satisfactory translation of Simon Armitage found in the 9th edition of the NA.
  • Contextual readings:  Review Chaucer's ballads "Gentilesse" (online reading) and "Truth" (trouthe), NA 344-5, and carefully read the modern English translations of these two poems in the one-page .PDF file (on e-reserve in the Required Readings folder on Canvas).  Consult the NA footnotes and marginal glossing (translations), as well as the modern translations, as you look at the original Middle English texts.
     
Day 2 (F 10/9/29): Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, conclusion; NEW READING: Malory's Morte Darthure

Required Background Readings:


Required Primary Readings:
  • Malory, packets of selections from the Morte Darthur available on e-reserve in the Required Readings folder on Canvas; use Malory Readings (Penguin Classics, vol. II) to help you navigate these selections.
  • Malory, NA selections from Morte Darthur, NA 482-500.
  • Caxton's Preface and chart of the divisions of Malory's Le Morte D'arthur (.PDF file, 3 pp., on e-reserve in Canvas)

Text info:
  • Sir Gawain and the Green Knight is an Arthurian romance written in Middle English by the poet commonly referred to as  the Pearl Poet (active ca. 1375-1400).  SGGK has a circular narrative structure: it begins and ends at Arthur's court, where Gawain undertakes his quest, and to which he returns to recount his adventures when the quest is complete.  Formally, in is divided into four sections (or "fitts") which combine alliterative and rhymed verse.  The complex hybrid form alternates long stanzas of Middle English Alliterative verse with five-line stanzas in rhyme which consist of a two-syllable line called the bob which rhymes in an ABABA pattern with the following quatrain, called the wheel.
  • Middle English Alliterative Verse is essentially the same form as the alliterative verse of the Old English (Anglo-Saxon era) period.  In Middle English alliterative verse, MOST lines still follow the basic pattern established in Old English alliterative verse: the alliterative line does not contain a fixed number of syllables but typically has four stressed syllables; it is separated into two half lines by a pause in the middle called a medial caesura; typically, each half line contains two stressed syllables; and in most cases, the first three stressed syllables (but not the fourth) alliterate with each other, i.e., they begin with the same sound (either a consonant sound or a vowel/H). However, these rules have loosened up considerably by the late fourteenth century, so in Middle English alliterative verse, there is more variation and the "rules" are not always followed (for example, some lines may contain more than four stressed syllables; fewer or more than three stressed syllables in a line may alliterate with each other; sometimes there are lines with no alliteration at all; etc.)
  • A ballad is a poem in rhymed verse of at least three stanzas which follow the same rhyme scheme and have the same final line (called the refrain); a word or phrase from this final line is usually used as the poem's title.  We are reading two ballads by the Pearl Poet's famous contemporary, Chaucer (lived ca. 1343-1400): "Trouthe" and "Gentilesse."
  • Sir Thomas Malory (ca. 1405-1471) wrote the Morte Darthur, a lengthy romance in English prose, in 1469-70.  Malory's primary sources were the early thirteenth-century French prose romances commonly referred to as the "Vulgate Cycle" or the "Lancelot-Grail Cycle."  These massive prose romances date from the early 13th century; they were the creation of Cistercian monks who reworked what they apparently considered to be "vain and idle" stories set at the Arthurian court in order to connect Arthurian tradition to salvation history, e.g. by sending Arthur's knight on the quest of the Holy Grail.  Malory's text has come down to us in two forms:  an early printed book published in 1485 by William Caxton (of which the Preface is an assigned e-reserve reading), and the so-called Winchester Manuscript, which was discovered in 1934.
LOOKING AHEAD 1 (OUT OF CLASS WRITING):  Ungraded ME 2 (a two-page Mini-Essay on a Lai by Marie de France, Chaucer's Franklin's Tale, or Sir Gawain and the Green Knight) is due to your assigned Canvas Mini-Essay Discussion Forum no later than MIDNIGHT on Sunday, 10/18/20. 

Required Classmate Responses must be submitted by MIDNIGHT on Tuesday, 10/20/20, as replies to the MEs posted by TWO members of your discussion group,
  • The printable .docx file copy of your ME 2 attached to your Discussion Group ME 2 posting should include your name, discussion group number, and submission date at top left (but don't include that identifying information when you paste the text of your ME into the "reply" field).    On the title line, centered,  put "ME 2:" followed by your title, which should include (but not simply be) the title of the work(s) and/or author you are writing on.
  • Prior to writing ME 2, carefully read the guidelines for Discussion Board Mini-Essays and Classmate Responses.  You must FOLLOW THESE GUIDELINES (click on the links) to receive credit for Discussion Board assignments.
  • To receive credit for ME 2, you must post TWO short Classmate Responses, each of which must include additional textual support from the medieval text (passages not included in the ME to which you are responding) to each of TWO Mini-Essays posted by other members of your Discussion Board group) no later than midnight on Tuesday, 10/20/20.

LOOKING AHEAD 2 ("STUDY QUIZ" 2):
  • Your completed "STUDY QUIZ 2" (on Anglo-Norman and Arthurian literature) must be FULLY filled out, scanned as a multi-page .PDF file under the filename "[yourlastname]330-01Q2.pdf" and emailed to Dr. Schwartz as a scanned, multi-page .PDF document by midnight on Monday 10/19/20.  Subject line of email: ENGL 330 Quiz 2
  • This OPEN BOOK exercise replaces the objective component of a timed exam; it allows you to demonstrate your grasp of factual knowledge covered in class and your recognition of key passages discussed in lectures.  The complete set of "study quizzes" for the quarter will be graded holistically and will together count for 10% of your final course grade.



Week 5   (October 14-16)
Day 1 (W 10/14/20): Arthurian Romance 2 and Middle English Spirituality 1: Malory's Morte Darthur
[As necessary, wrap up discussion of the Pearl Poet's Sir Gawain and the Green Knight]

Required Background Reading: 
Required Primary Reading:
  • Malory, all three packets of selections from the Morte Darthur available on e-reserve in the Required Readings folder on Canvas (26 pp. of .PDFs in 3 files)
  • Malory, additional selections from Morte Darthur, NA 482-500.
  • Contextual reading: Caxton's Preface and chart of the structural divisions of Malory's Le Morte D'arthur, on e-reserve in the Required Reacings Folder on Canvas (.PDF file, 3 pp.)
     
Day 2 (F 10/16/20): Middle English Spirituality II: Mystical Marriage and Christ as Bridegroom in Pearl
[As necessary, wrap up discussion of Malory]

Required Background Reading:

  • Review NA 16-17 (paragraph on the Pearl Poet), 27 (timeline for fourteenth century), and 183-5 (headnote to SGGK);
  • Review online readings The Alliterative Revival and Courtly Love.
  • New Online Readings:  study guide for Pearl and Introduction to Medieval Allegory
  • Marie Boroff's introduction to Pearl, on e-reserve in PolyLearn (PRL vii-xxi , PDF file, 10 pp.); this introduction should be printed out, placed in your course binder, and brought with you to class

Required Primary Reading:
  • Pearl: text of MARIE BOROFF TRANSLATION in recommended Pearl Poet textbook, or as .PDF file (16 pp., on e-reserve in Polylearn).  Please PRINT OUT both introduction and text and have with you to class.
 
TEXT INFO: 
  • For background information on Malory, see Text Info for Wk. 4.
  • Pearl and Sir Gawain and the Green Knight are thought to be the work of the same poet, commonly referred to as the Pearl Poet, who was active ca. 1375-1400 and, along with William Langland, was the most important English poet of the Alliterative Revival.  His/her work is preserved in a single manuscript which also contains two biblically inspired poems thought to be the work of the same author. 
  • Pearl is an allegorical dream vision in which a father mourns the death of his two-year-old daughter whose soul appears to teach him important spiritual lessons. While there is alliteration in some lines, the poem is not written in alliterative verse; the complex rhyming structure links 12-line stanzas of rhymed verse in a complicated circular form using concatenation, or overlapping repetition. The poem contains twenty sections, all of which contain five stanzas, with the exception of section 15, which has six stanzas.
     
REMINDER 1: Your Ungraded ME 2 (a two-page Mini-Essay on a lai by Marie de France, OR on Chaucer's "Breton Lai" The Franklin's Tale, OR on Sir Gawain and the Green Knight) is due to your assigned Canvas Mini-Essay Discussion Forum no later than MIDNIGHT on Sunday, 10/18/20. 

BASIC ME GUIDELINES:
  • Your 2-page ME should be grounded in close reading:  this means that your textually based analysis must cite and explain multiple passages from the medieval text to demonstrate the validity of clearly articulated claims about the medieval text.  Rule of thumb: you should quote and analyze at least 2-3 passages from the medieval text in shorter body paragraphs (1/2 page or less in length); weave at least 3-4 quotations from the medieval text into any longer body paragraphs (over 1/2 page in length).  All quotations should be followed by a parenthetical reference containing the page number on which the quote is found (or the inclusive line numbers for verse passages with numbered lines).
  • Because anout-of-class ME replaces in-class exam essays, do NOT simply write whatever strikes your fancy; the goal is to demonstrate your understanding of the medieval text as it was presented in lectures:  why we read it, and how close reading suggests the purpose for which it was created and the message it conveyed to its target audience. 
  • Your Opening paragraph should fully and explicitly articulate the claims (and sub-claims) you are making in your ME; this introduction should also include any background informationessentia l to your argument, including but not limited to date, authorship, target audience, generic conventions, and definitions of terms central to your analysis.
  • Use the ME TEMPLATE available on Canvas to ensure proper formatting of your document and correct documentation of your source.  Be sure to OPEN AND READ the template, as it contains additional pointers on how to write a strong ME.
  • REMINDER: in your ME, you must cite the SPECIFIC TRANSLATION that is required for this class. The translation may be found in a required textbook (e.g. for Lanval and Chevrefoil, use the NA); for other texts, use the required translations on e-reserve or linked electronically to the Calendar of Assignments: e.g. for Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, use Marie Borroff's translation from the .PDF files on e-reserve in Canvas (bibliographic information for these e-reserve files is included at the beginning or end of the .PDF file); for The Franklin's Tale, use the David Wright translation of the Canterbury Tales from the Kennedy Library's electronic collections. 
  • Document quotations parenthetically using line numbers if provided; use page numbers only for texts in prose or verse texts where lines are not numbered.


ME SUBMISSION GUIDELINES:
  • Save your ungraded ME 2 as a .docx file under the file name "[your Last Name]330ME2_F20.docx" and attach this file to your Canvas Discussion Board posting.   NOTE:  a .docx text is required 1) so that your essay can be added to the database of previously submitted essays used to check for possible cases of plagiarism; and 2) to ensure that I can open and print out the file.  
  • CUT AND PASTE the TEXT and WORK CITED (only -- not your personal identifying info or the ME number and title) into the message field of your posting.  Check and correct the formatting.
  • Put the ME number followed by a colon and your ME title on the Subject Line of the posting. (No need to include your last name, as your posting already identifies you by name.)

REMINDER 2:
Required Classmate Responses to ME 2 must be submitted by MIDNIGHT on Tuesday, 10/20/20 as replies to MEs posted by TWO members of your discussion group,
  • The printable .docx file copy of your ME 2 attached to your Discussion Group posting should include a header providing your name, class section, and the date.    On the title line,  put "ME 2:" followed by your title, which should include (but not simply be) the title of the work(s) and/or author you are writing on.
  • Prior to writing ME 2, carefully read the guidelines for Discussion Board Mini-Essays and Classmate Responses.  You must FOLLOW THESE GUIDELINES (click on the links) to receive credit for Discussion Board assignments.
  • To receive credit for ME 2, you must post TWO short Classmate Responses, each of which must include additional textual support from the medieval text (i.e. passages not quoted in the ME to which you are responding) to each of TWO Mini-Essays posted by other members of your Discussion Board group) no later than midnight on Tuesday, 10/20/20.
     
REMINDER 3: Your completed "STUDY QUIZ 2" (on Anglo-Norman and Arthurian literature) must be FULLY filled out and emailed to Dr. Schwartz as either a .docx file or a scanned .PDF document by midnight on MONDAY, 10/19/20. This OPEN BOOK exercise replaces the objective component of a timed exam; it allows you to demonstrate your grasp of factual knowledge covered in class and your recognition of key passages discussed in lectures.
The complete set of "study quizzes" for the quarter will be graded holistically and will together count for 10% of your final course grad

LOOKING AHEAD:  Official Peer Editing Feedback on a classmate's ME 2 will be due to BOTH Dr. Schwartz and the ME Author via email by midnight on Sunday, 10/25/20.
  • The classmate whose ME you have been assigned to provide "Official" Peer Editing Feedback on is listed in the chart posted in your Canvas Discussion Group.
  • This assignment consists of the filled out Essay Evaluation Checklist (available as a .PDF or .docx file on Canvas -- do NOT print out the webpage version linked below for your perusal); the summative comment with specific suggestions about new ground to cover  in the expanded essay, including at least one quote from the medieval text that you feel could enrich the expanded essay; and the peer-edited 2-page ME.
  • Use the grading codes at the bottom of the Essay Evaluation Checklist as you peer-edit the hard copy of your classmate's ME; circle or bracket passages/words to which the code applies. On the Checklist, circle or asterisk the grading codes you have used in the body of the peer-edited ME; write your summative comment with suggestions for revision and expansion on the back of the checklist (not on the ME itself).
  • Fill out the checklist thoughtfully, adding a word or two to explain what should be corrected or clarified by the writer if you check a "no" (e.g., what background info or definition is lacking? What leap in logic did you notice?)
    NOTE: Peer Editors who check only "yes" are not providing helpful feedback.  Even the strongest writing will benefit from careful editing and revision.  Your job as Peer Editor is to help your classmate identify areas of the ME that could be strengthened through the revision process.  If you notice that an ME you are peer-editing does not follow some of the assignment guidelines, point out what needs fixing. But even when an ME follows guidelines carefully and is well written, you can help a classmate strengthen their writing.  Be the extra pair of eyes that help identify aspects of an already strong ME that could be made even stronger through revision.
  • On the back of the checklist, the peer editor should write a summative comment with specific suggestions for new ground to cover if the writer chooses to revise and expand the two-page ME into a three-to-four page graded essay.  While it's fine to summarize what you see as the strengths and weaknesses of the ME, there is no need to reiterate issues of mechanics, organization and style already addressed by the Checklist.  The most important (and helpful) part of a summative comment is your specific suggestions for expansion.
  • At the top of the Checklist, write "Feedback by" and your name, "Feedback to" and the ME author's name, and your Canvas Discussion Group number. When you save this peer editing assignment, put the documents in this order: Filled out Checklist, Summative Comment, Edited ME.
  • This OFFICIAL peer-editing assignment is no longer a "dry run"; it is a required and (holistically) GRADED assignment, worth 10% of your final course grade. 
  • Submitting this assignment on time (and following the guidelines) also counts towards the 30% "participation, intellectual Engagement and Collaboration" component of the final course grade. 
     


Week 6   (October 21 - 23) 
Day 1 (W 10/21/20): Middle English Spirituality II: Mystical Marriage and Christ as Bridegroom in Pearl, cont.

Required Background Reading:

  • Review NA 16-17 (paragraph on the Pearl Poet), 27 (timeline for fourteenth century), and 183-5 (headnote to SGGK);
  • Review online readings The Alliterative Revival and Courtly Love.
  • New Online Readings:  study guide for Pearl and Introduction to Medieval Allegory
  • Marie Boroff's introduction to Pearl, on e-reserve in PolyLearn (PRL vii-xxi , PDF file, 10 pp.); this introduction should be printed out, placed in your course binder, and brought with you to class

Required Primary Reading:
  • Pearl: text of MARIE BOROFF TRANSLATION in recommended Pearl Poet textbook, or as .PDF file (16 pp., on e-reserve in Polylearn).  Please PRINT OUT both introduction and text and have with you to class.
 

As time permits:  Begin Middle English Spirituality III: Reasons to Choose the Spiritual over the Earthly Bridegroom in the 13th-Century
Hali Meidhad ("A Letter on Virginity")

Required Background Reading for Hali Meidhad:

  • NA 13 (last paragraph of "Anglo-Norman Literature" section, on ME religious prose) and NA 27 (timeline 13th century)
  • Medieval English Prose for Women [=PW] Introduction xi-xx, xxxviii, xli-xliii.  NOTE:  if you did not purchase the required textbook Medieval English Prose for Women, you will find this introduction on e-reserve in the Required Readings folder on Canvas under the file name "Millett and Wogan-Browne, Introduction, Medieval English Prose for Women"
  • Hali Meidhad section of the Introduction to the texts of the "Katherine Group" from recommended textbook Anchoritic Spirituality (on e-reserve in the Required Readings folder on Canvas under the file name "Savage and Watson, Introduction to Anchoritic Spirituality"
  • Online readings: Introduction to Medieval Allegory and study guide for Hali Meidhad ("A Letter on Virginity")

Required Primary Reading:


Day 2 (F 10/23/20): Medieval Spirituality 3: Seinte Margarete, Ancrene Wisse; if time permits, introduction to Medieval Spirituality 4: the "Affective Piety" of Julian of Norwich and Margery Kempe

[As needed, complete discussion of texts assigned for last class meeting]


Required Background and Primary Readings:
  • Review NA 13 (last paragraph of "Anglo-Norman Literature" section, on ME religious prose) and NA 27 (timeline 13th century);
  • Review Medieval English Prose for Women [=PW] Introduction xx-xxv, xxxiv-xxxviii.  NOTE:  if you did not purchase the required textbook Medieval English Prose for Women, you will find this introduction on e-reserve in the Required Readings folder on Canvas under the file name "Millett and Wogan-Browne, Introduction, Medieval English Prose for Women"
  • Review Introduction to the texts of the "Katherine Group" from recommended textbook Anchoritic Spirituality (on e-reserve in the Required Readings folder on Canvas under the file name "Savage and Watson, Introduction to Anchoritic Spirituality"
  • Online reading: study guide for Seinte Margarete
  • Read NA 137-8 (headnote to Ancrene Wisse); NA  395-6 (on "Christ's Humanity"); PW Introduction xxix-xxxviii;
  • Online reading: Ancrene Wisse study guide; review Medieval Allegory.


Required Primary Reading:
  • Seinte Margarete, PW 44-85 [NOTE: required reading is the modern translation only, found on odd-numbered pages].  For the convenience of students who did not purchase the required textbook, a different translation of the text is on e-reserve in the required readings folder on Canvas.
  • Ancrene Wisse (parts 7 and 8), PW 110-149 [NOTE: required reading is the modern translation only, found on odd-numbered pages].  For the convenience of students who did not purchase the required textbook, a different partial translation of the text is on e-reserve in the required readings folder on Canvas.

IF TIME PERMITS:   Backgrounds to Julian of Norwich and Margery Kempe

Required Background Reading:

  • Background: NA 17-18 (paragraphs mentioning Julian of Norwich and Margery Kempe); NA 395-6 (on "Christ's Humanity"); NA 412-3 (headnote to Julian of Norwich); NA 424-425 (headnote to Margery Kempe); online reading: Women Mystics study guide.

Required Primary Reading:

  • Julian of Norwich, A Book of Showings, selections NA 414-24;
  • Margery Kempe, The Book of Margery Kempe, selections NA 425-38; Supplemental (but REQUIRED) Margery Kempe readings (episodes found in NA, 7th ed., pp. 371-2 and 374-7): "A Visit with Julian of Norwich" and "Examination before the Archbishop" (.PDF file, 3 pp., on e-reserve in the Required Readings folder on Canvas; PRINT OUT AND BRING WITH YOU TO CLASS) 
     
Text Info:
  • For background on the Pearl poet and the allegorical dream vision Pearl, see Text Info for Wk. 5.
  • Hali Meidhad (literally "Holy Maidenhead" [=Virginity]; translated in our textbook under the title "A Letter on Virginity") is a didactic letter based primarily on Latin sources but written in Middle English prose by an unknown author, probably a Dominican monk, in the early 13th century It aims to persuade young girls to choose the spiritual path (life as an Anchoress or religious recluse) over the worldly life (as a real-life wife and mother), by drawing comparisons between two potential "bridegrooms": the clearly superior spiritual husband is Jesus Christ, who will make her Queen of Heaven -- a far more pleasant life than that of a typical, real-life 13th-century wife. Like Seinte Margarete and the Ancrene Wisse, it is part of a group of texts collectively referred to as the "Katherine Group."
  • Seinte Margarete is a Middle English prose hagiography (or saint's life) written in the early 13th century by an unknown author, probably a Dominican monk, for a female audience (supposedly, for three sisters who were entering religious life as anchoresses, i.e. religious recluses, but suitable for a broader audience of religious women -- and men).  Its primary source is a Latin hagiography by Mombritius, but the unknown author also draws on a broad range of other works in Latin, English, French, and Welsh.  Like Hali Meidhad and the Ancrene Wisse, it is part of a group of texts collectively referred to as the "Katherine Group."
  • The Ancrene Wisse, ("Wisdom/Knowledge for Anchoresses"), also called the Ancrene Riwle ("Rules for Anchoresses"), is an early 13th-century work in Middle English prose by an unknown author, probably a Dominican monk, and possibly also the author of the associated works from the so-called "Katherine Group," Hali Meidhad and Seinte Margarete. (The three works were certainly written for the same target audience.)  It presents a set of rules to govern the lives of Anchoresses, with primary focus on their spiritual life (the so-called "Inner Rule") rather than their physical existence (behavior, dress, diet, activities, etc., the so-called "Outer Rule").
  • Julian of Norwich lived from 1342 to ca. 1416. The Book of Showings, written in English prose, dates from ca. 1390.  It is an account of sixteen mystical visions she says she received in 1373 and meditated on over the course of almost twenty years as an Anchoress, or religious recluse.  The text exists in both shorter and longer forms.  It is an important piece of late medieval religious mysticism and in certain respects a spiritual autobiography.
  • The Book of Margery Kempe is a work of spiritual autobiography dating from 1436-8.  Its author, Margery Kempe, was an illiterate housewife who lived ca. 1373-1438; she dictated her book to two priests who served as her scribes (and may have helped edit her book, but who were NOT its authors).
OUT-OF-CLASS WRITING REMINDER: PEER EDIT TWO
  • Official Peer Editing Feedback on a classmate's ME 2 will be due to BOTH Dr. Schwartz and the ME Author via email by midnight on Sunday, 10/25/20.
  • The classmate whose ME you have been assigned to provide "Official" Peer Editing Feedback on is listed in the chart posted in your Canvas Discussion Group.
  • This assignment consists of the filled out Essay Evaluation Checklist (available as a .PDF or .docx file on Canvas -- do NOT print out the webpage version linked below for your perusal); the summative comment with specific suggestions about new ground to cover  in the expanded essay, including at least one quote from the medieval text that you feel could enrich the expanded essay; and the peer-edited 2-page ME.
  • Use the grading codes at the bottom of the Essay Evaluation Checklist as you peer-edit the hard copy of your classmate's ME; circle or bracket passages/words to which the code applies. On the Checklist, circle or asterisk the grading codes you have used in the body of the peer-edited ME; write your summative comment with suggestions for revision and expansion on the back of the checklist (not on the ME itself).
  • Fill out the checklist thoughtfully, adding a word or two to explain what should be corrected or clarified by the writer if you check a "no" (e.g., what background info or definition is lacking? What leap in logic did you notice?)
    NOTE: Peer Editors who check only "yes" are not providing helpful feedback.  Even the strongest writing will benefit from careful editing and revision.  Your job as Peer Editor is to help your classmate identify areas of the ME that could be strengthened through the revision process.  If you notice that an ME you are peer-editing does not follow some of the assignment guidelines, point out what needs fixing. But even when an ME follows guidelines carefully and is well written, you can help a classmate strengthen their writing.  Be the extra pair of eyes that help identify aspects of an already strong ME that could be made even stronger through revision.
  • On the back of the checklist, the peer editor should write a summative comment with specific suggestions for new ground to cover if the writer chooses to revise and expand the two-page ME into a three-to-four page graded essay.  While it's fine to summarize what you see as the strengths and weaknesses of the ME, there is no need to reiterate issues of mechanics, organization and style already addressed by the Checklist.  The most important (and helpful) part of a summative comment is your specific suggestions for expansion.
  • At the top of the Checklist, write "Feedback by" and your name, "Feedback to" and the ME author's name, and your Canvas Discussion Group number. When you save this peer editing assignment, put the documents in this order: Filled out Checklist, Summative Comment, Edited ME.
  • This OFFICIAL peer-editing assignment is no longer a "dry run"; it is a required and (holistically) GRADED assignment, worth 10% of your final course grade. 
  • Submitting this assignment on time (and following the guidelines) also counts towards the 30% "participation, intellectual Engagement and Collaboration" component of the final course grade. 


LOOKING AHEAD:
  • Your ungraded ME 3, a two-page mini-essay on , will be due by midnight on Sun. 11/1/20; two ungraded CRs will be due by midnight on Tuesday 11/3/20.
  • Your completed "STUDY QUIZ 3" (on the works representing Medieval Spirituality:  The Vulgate Cycle/Malory, Pearl, the works of the Katherine Group, Julian of Norwich, and Margery Kempe) must be FULLY filled out and emailed to Dr. Schwartz as either a .docx file or a scanned .PDF document by midnight on MONDAY, 11/2/20
    This OPEN BOOK exercise replaces the objective component of a timed exam; it allows you to demonstrate your grasp of factual knowledge covered in class and your recognition of key passages discussed in lectures.  The complete set of "study quizzes" for the quarter will be graded holistically and will together count for 10% of your final course grade.


Week 7   (October 28-30)
Day 1 (W 10/28/20): Ancrene Wisse, conclusion; Medieval Spirituality 4: the "Affective Piety" of Julian of Norwich and Margery Kempe

[As needed, complete discussion of texts assigned for last class meeting] 

Topic 1) 13th-century Prose for Women, conclusion: the Ancrene Wisseks to an external

Topic 2) Women Mystics of the 15th Century:  the Book of Showings (by the Anchoress Julian of Norwich); the Book of Margery Kempe (by the illiterate housewife Margery Kempe; written down by two priests who revered her for her visions and served as her scribes, but were NOT the "authors" of Margery's text)

Topic 3) The Human Side of God: Medieval Devotional Lyrics

Required Background Readings:
  • Review NA 13 (last paragraph of "Anglo-Norman Literature" section, on ME religious prose); NA 17-18 (paragraphs mentioning Julian of Norwich and Margery Kempe); NA 137-8 (headnote to Ancrene Wisse); NA  395-6 (on "Christ's Humanity");  NA 412-3 (headnote to Julian of Norwich); NA 424-425 (headnote to Margery Kempe); and NA 27-28 (timeline for 13th -15th centuries)
  • Review Medieval English Prose for Women [=PW] Introduction, xxix-xxxviii.  NOTE:  if you did not purchase the required textbook Medieval English Prose for Women, you will find this introduction on e-reserve in the Required Readings folder on Canvas under the file name "Millett and Wogan-Browne, Introduction, Medieval English Prose for Women"
  • Review discussion of the Ancrene Wisse in the Introduction to the texts of the "Katherine Group" from the recommended textbook Anchoritic Spirituality (on e-reserve in the Required Readings folder on Canvas under the file name "Savage and Watson, Introduction to Anchoritic Spirituality")
  • Review online Study Guides for Ancrene Wisse and Women Mystics of the 15th Century
  • NEW NA READINGS:  NA 395-6 (on "Christ's Humanity"); NA 408-9 (headnote to Middle English Incarnation and Crucifixion Lyrics)
  • NEW ONLINE READING: Medieval Lyrics Study Guide
     
Recommended Background and Contextual Readings:
  • Opening of the biblical (Old Testament) Song of Songs (.PDF file, 2 pp., is on e-reserve in Canvas).  NOTE: I have provided the full text of this short from the Old Testament of the Bible for those who may be unfamiliar with its beautiful love poetry.  St. Bernard of Clairvaux wrote eighty-six sermons that focus exclusively on the second verse, "Let him kiss me with the kisses of his mouth: for thy love is better than wine"); these sermons offer lessons derived from allegorical interpretation of the speaker (the Bride) and her beloved ("him," and "thy," the Bridegroom),
  • SKIM selections from St. Bernard of Clairvaux's Sermons on the Song of Songs to see how the Bride and the Bridegroom are interpreted allegorically (.PDF file, 16 pp., on e-reserve in the Recommended Readings folder on Canvas)
  • If you have time:  browse through the images found on Dr. Schwartz's Medieval Iconography pages

Required Primary Reading:
  • Ancrene Wisse (parts 7 and 8), PW 110-149 [NOTE: required reading is the modern translation only, found on odd-numbered pages].  For the convenience of students who did not purchase the required textbook, a different partial translation of the text is on e-reserve in the required readings folder on Canvas.
  • Julian of Norwich, A Book of Showings, selections NA 414-24;
  • Margery Kempe, The Book of Margery Kempe, selections NA 425-38, and (from the .PDF file on e-reserve in the Required Readings folder on Canvas) two supplemental episodes: "A Visit with Julian of Norwich" and "Examination before the Archbishop" (scanned from the 7th ed. of the NA, pp. 371-2 and 374-7).   
  • Six Middle English Incarnation and Crucifixion lyrics, NA 409-411
  • Online Reading:  Four Additional Marian Lyrics
     
Day 2 (F 10/30/20): The Human Side of God, 2: The Second Shepherds' Play

[As needed, complete discussion of poems assigned for previous class meeting]

Required Background Readings for The Second Shepherds' Play

  • Review NA 17-19 ("The Fifteenth Century"); NA 27-28 (timeline for 15th century)
  • Online Study Guide for The Second Shepherd's Play
  • NEW: NA 439 (headnote to the York Play of the Crucifixion -- but NOT the text); 447-49 (Mystery Plays; headnote to The Second Shepherd's Play).
  • Chart: The Contents of the N-Town Plays Cycle.  This chart is found on the last page of a 5-page .PDF file on e-reserve in the Recommended Readings folder of PolyLearn (to avoid confusion -- the play of the Creation of the World and Fall of Adam and Eve, in the same .PDF file, is a recommended primary reading but NOT a required one).

Required Primary Reading: Recommended Primary Readings:
  • N-Town Play 2: Creation of the World and Fall of Adam and Eve.  The text of the play is found in a .PDF file, 5 pp., on e-reserve in the Recommended Readings folder of PolyLearn.  Note that the last page of this file contains a REQUIRED background reading:  the chart of the Contents of the N-Town Plays cycle.

Text Info: 
  • Only two assigned lyrics are of known authorship:  "What is he, this lordling, that cometh from the fight" is by William Herebert and dates from the early fourteenth century, before 1333 (the year of Herebert's death); the online reading"Sainte Marie viergene" is by Saint Godric and dates from the late twelfth century. 
  • The other assigned lyrics are of unknown authorship. Do not worry about dates for the other poems in the NA. From the online readings, the anonymous lyric "Gabriel fram heven-king" dates from the early thirteenth century, "Lullay, Lullay" from the fourteenth century, and "Ther is no rose of swych virtu" from the fifteenth century.
  • For additional text info on the assigned lyric poems, see the Norton Anthology introduction and the information on the page of supplemental readings.  Be able to identify specific poems by titles or by first line. The biblical Song of Songs is a beautiful piece of erotic love poetry from the Old Testament. Also known as the Song of Solomon (because it was purportedly written by King Solomon) or as the Canticle of Canticles, it comprises eight chapters of erotic love poetry recounting the love between a Bride and her Bridegroom.
  • In the mid-twelfth century, the Cistercian monk St. Bernard of Clairvaux (lived ca. 1090/1-1153) wrote a series of eighty-six sermons on the first two verses of the Song of Songs, the Sermones super Cantica canticorum ("Sermons on the Song of Songs"). He began work on them in 1135 and left them unfinished at his death in 1153. These sermons offer allegorical readings of the love affair between Bride and Bridegroom in the Song of Songs, suggesting that the ecstatic union of the human soul with God is analogous to the marital bliss of wife (soul) and husband (God).
  • The Second Shepherds' Play was written ca. 1475 by an unknown author referred to as the Wakefield Master.  This Mystery Play connects the scriptural account of Christ's Nativity and the Angel's Annunciation to the Shepherds of Christ's Birth to the lives of ordinary 15th-century people. It is written in "thirteeners," 13-line rhyming stanzas with the rhyme scheme ABAB ABAB CDDDC, in which the first "C" rhyme line is frequently shorter than the other lines.
  • "Mystery Plays"are dramatized scripture used to teach salvation history to the illiterate. They were performed by Guilds (something like a modern trade union crossed with the Rotary Club). To be effective, a Mystery Play needed to be entertaining, but its underlying purpose was serious: to engage the interest and understanding of the audience in order to help them be better Christians.
  • Mystery plays came in CYCLES: a series of plays which together were meant to present ALL OF SACRED HISTORY, from the Creation of the World through the End of Time (the Last Judgment), with particular emphasis on human history: the Fall of mankind and how Original Sin was redeemed through the Nativity, Incarnation and Passion of Christ.
REMINDERS:
  • OUT OF CLASS WRITING: Your ungraded ME 3, a two-page mini-essay on ONE text from our unit on Medieval Spirituality -- Malory OR Pearl OR Hali Meidhad OR Seinte Margarete OR Ancrene Wisse OR Julian of Norwich OR Margery Kempe -- is due by midnight on Sun. 11/1/20; two ungraded CRs are due by midnight on Tuesday 11/3/20.  Be sure to follow the usual submission guidelines
  • Your completed "STUDY QUIZ 3" (on Medieval Spirituality) must be FULLY filled out and emailed to Dr. Schwartz as either a .docx file or a scanned .PDF document by midnight on MONDAY, 11/2/20
    This OPEN BOOK exercise replaces the objective component of a timed exam; it allows you to demonstrate your grasp of factual knowledge covered in class and your recognition of key passages discussed in lectures.  The complete set of "study quizzes" for the quarter will be graded holistically and will together count for 10% of your final course grade.

LOOKING AHEAD:

  • Official Peer Editing Feedback on a classmate's ME 3 will be due to BOTH Dr. Schwartz and the ME Author via email by midnight on Sunday, 11/8/20.
  • The classmate whose ME you have been assigned to provide "Official" Peer Editing Feedback on is listed in the chart posted in your Canvas Discussion Group.
  • This assignment consists of the filled out Essay Evaluation Checklist (available as a .PDF or .docx file on Canvas -- do NOT print out the webpage version linked below for your perusal); the summative comment with specific suggestions about new ground to cover  in the expanded essay, including at least one quote from the medieval text that you feel could enrich the expanded essay; and the peer-edited 2-page ME.
  • Use the grading codes at the bottom of the Essay Evaluation Checklist as you peer-edit the hard copy of your classmate's ME; circle or bracket passages/words to which the code applies. On the Checklist, circle or asterisk the grading codes you have used in the body of the peer-edited ME; write your summative comment with suggestions for revision and expansion on the back of the checklist (not on the ME itself).
  • Fill out the checklist thoughtfully, adding a word or two to explain what should be corrected or clarified by the writer if you check a "no" (e.g., what background info or definition is lacking? What leap in logic did you notice?)
    NOTE: Peer Editors who check only "yes" are not providing helpful feedback.  Even the strongest writing will benefit from careful editing and revision.  Your job as Peer Editor is to help your classmate identify areas of the ME that could be strengthened through the revision process.  If you notice that an ME you are peer-editing does not follow some of the assignment guidelines, point out what needs fixing. But even when an ME follows guidelines carefully and is well written, you can help a classmate strengthen their writing.  Be the extra pair of eyes that help identify aspects of an already strong ME that could be made even stronger through revision.
  • On the back of the checklist, the peer editor should write a summative comment with specific suggestions for new ground to cover if the writer chooses to revise and expand the two-page ME into a three-to-four page graded essay.  While it's fine to summarize what you see as the strengths and weaknesses of the ME, there is no need to reiterate issues of mechanics, organization and style already addressed by the Checklist.  The most important (and helpful) part of a summative comment is your specific suggestions for expansion.
  • At the top of the Checklist, write "Feedback by" and your name, "Feedback to" and the ME author's name, and your Canvas Discussion Group number. When you save this peer editing assignment, put the documents in this order: Filled out Checklist, Summative Comment, Edited ME.
  • This second OFFICIAL peer-editing assignment is no longer a "dry run"; it is a required and GRADED assignment, worth 10% of your final course grade, that also counts towards the 30% "participation, intellectual Engagement and Collaboration" component of the final course grade. 

GWR CERTIFICATION PORTFOLIO: If you wish to receive GWR certification for this class, you must submit the following documents to me, as attachments to a single email with the subject line "ENGL 330 GWR Portfolio," no later than midnight on Monday, 11/30/20.  Your GWR Portfolio should consist of:
  1. Your final 4-page essay (the same .docx file submitted to Dr. Schwartz for grading on Sunday, 11/22/20)
  2. The peer-edited version of your ME 2 or ME 3 which you revised and expanded as your graded essay (the .PDF file sent to you by your Peer Editor)
  3. What you feel is the strongest set of Peer-Editing Feedback you prepared for a classmate (the same .PDF file you sent the ME author and Dr. Schwartz)
  4. A one-page Personal Reflection on how the writing and revision assignments for this class, as well as the peer-editing you have done for classmates, has helped you improve as a writer.  This personal reflection should offer a self-assessment of your progress, mention the items included in your portfolio, and explain how they contributed to your growth as a writer. This Personal Reflection should be submitted as a one-page .docx file saved under the filename "[yourlastname]330GWRportfolioF20.docx"; please be sure to include at the top of the page: your name, the class number, and the date of submission.

    While I cannot  guarantee your success, I anticipate that everyone trying for GWR certification in ENGL 330 will receive it -- provided of course that you follow Portfolio Guidelines and earn a grade of C or better in the class -- something that should be true of everyone who has attended class regularly and submitted all assignments. 

    Please note that while the GWR Portfolio submission deadline is Monday, 11/30/20, you may submit your GWR Portfolio at any time after you have completed your Final Essay and submitted it for grading.  I will let you know that you have submitted a passing portfolio as soon as I have assessed it so that you will know whether you have received GWR as soon as your final course grade is posted.  I truly appreciate your hard work and engagement in ENGL 330!  I hope that this procedure will help alleviate any anxiety you may have about the GWR as we near the end of this unprecedentedly difficult quarter.




 
Week 8 (November 4 - 6
Day 1 (W 11/4/20): 

TOPIC ONE: Marian lyrics (conclusion) and The Second Shepherds' Play

TOPIC TWO (if time permits): Introduction to Chaucer's Canterbury Tales 2: the General Prologue (Frame Narrative Set-Up and Opening Signals)

Required Background Readings

  • New online readings: Background to Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, General Prologue Study Guide and The Medieval Estates; NA 241-43 (headnotes on the Canterbury Tales collection and the General Prologue) and 19-24 (on Chaucer's English) and 25 (on Chaucer's verse form); NA 340 (headnote on the Close of the Canterbury Tales).  Also consult Chaucer Reading and Pronunciation Tips (.PDF file, 2 pp., one-reserve in Polylearn) and peruse the Map of the Pilgrimage Route/Chart of the Medieval Humors (.PDF file, 2 pp. on e-reserve in Polylearn). 
  • Review NA 13-17 (on the Fourteenth Century), 17 (Timeline for the Fourteenth Century), 238-41 (Chaucer biography).

Required Primary Reading:
  • Primary Text 1: The General Prologue to the Canterbury Tales: Skim through full translation of General Prologue (a .PDF of the David Wright translation is available on e-reserve in Canvas), paying particular attention to the beginning and the end; in your NA, slowly read (using notes AND translation) ing the following Middle English lines: GP lines 1-42 (the opening); Chaucer's comments on the "truth" of his fiction, GP lines 717-49; and the set-up of the story-telling contest, GP lines 771-82. (Full Middle English text of the GP is found NA 243-63).
  • NOTE: The Oxford World Classics textbook of the David Wright translation is also available electronically on the Kennedy Library Website (the General Prologue is found pp. 3-24), but you will likely find it easier to navigate the .PDF file on e-reserve in the Required Readings folder on Canvas.


Day 2 (F 11/6/20): Chaucer's Canterbury Tales 2: The General Prologue as Estates Satire: the Pilgrim Portraits
 [As needed, cover or complete discussion of the "set up" of the frame narrative collection in the beginning and end of the GP, listed above]
 

  • Review the General Prologue study guide and the online reading The Medieval Estates
  • Skim through all Pilgrim Portraits in modern translation, and carefully go through the portraits of the Knight, Squire, Prioress, Monk, Friar, Clerk, Wife of Bath, Parson, Plowman, and Pardoner, in both the modern translation and the Middle English text in the NA: GP lines 43-100, 118-271, 287-310, 447-543, 671-716. (Full Middle English text of the GP is found NA 243-63).  Lecture will focus on the text in the NA, but you should have BOTH the NA and a modern translation with you at all Chaucer class meetings.


TEXT INFO:
  • The Canterbury Tales (taken as a whole) is a "frame narrative" collection on which Chaucer worked during the last 14 years of his life (ca. 1386-1400).  Use this blanket date for all Canterbury Tales selections EXCEPT the Knight's Tale
  • A "frame narrative" is a work in which a group of story-tellers tell stories to each other. The individual stories that they tell are embedded within the narrative framework, which in the case of the Canterbury Tales is a pilgrimage to visit the shrine of St. Thomas â Becket at Canterbury Cathedral.
  • The General Prologue to the Canterbury Tales sets up the narrative framework of the collection.  It also functions independently as an example of the medieval genre known as Estates Satire. (See the online reading The Medieval Estates.) 
  • All 82 manuscripts of the Canterbury Tales begin with the General Prologue, followed by the Knight's Tale, the Miller's Tale, the Reeve's Tale and the Cook's Tale, which are are "glued together" by the dialogue between them.  Critics refer to this "chunk" of text as "Fragment 1."

LOOKING AHEAD 1:
  • The final open book, unlimited time "Study Quiz 4," on Chaucer's Canterbury Tales and medieval theatre (The Second Shepherds' Play and the Morality play Everyman) will be do no later than midnight on  Monday, November 23.  NOTE:  this due date has been changed so that you do not have two assignments due on the same day, and so that you can concentrate first on on your Graded 3-4-Page essay (due on Sunday, 11/22/20). 

LOOKING AHEAD 2: Out of Class Writing
  • Your GRADED 4-page ESSAY, worth 20% of the final course grade, is due via email attachment to Dr. Schwartz no later than midnight on SUNDAY, 11/22/20. The graded essay may be a significant expansion of your ME 2 or ME 3; alternatively, it can explore other issues in the same medieval text that was the focus of your ME 2 or ME 3.  Keep in mind that because this essay replaces the essay component of a standard exam, it must articulate (in your own words) your understanding of the issues in the medieval text that were pointed to in lectures. 
  • Like an ME, your graded essay should be grounded in close reading:  your textually based analysis must cite and explain passages from the medieval text to demonstrate the validity of clearly articulated claims about the medieval text.  Because the graded essay stands in for Exam Essays, it should demonstrate your grasp of ideas about the medieval text that were covered in class lectures. 
  • There are no separate guidelines for the graded 4-page essay since it is the same kind of assignment as a 2-page ME, from which it differs only in length and scope.  It should be formatted in the same way as an ME, so you may use the ME Template for basic formatting.  Please include your name, discussion group number,  and the due dateSINGLE SPACED, at the upper left of the first page. The title line should NOT begin "ME 1:" or "ME 2:" since this graded, 4-page Midterm Exam Essay is no longer a Mini-Essay; put your title only on the title line.  After the first page, number pages by using a header containing your last name and the page number.  
  • Unlike the essay section on an in-class Exam, there is no set of prompts to choose from for the graded 4-page essay, since it is frequently a revision and expansion of one of your 2-page MEs. The graded essay must be broader in scope than the original ME, as it should cover new ground (while focusing on the same medieval text that was the focus of the ME).  The essay should be at LEAST three full pages in length not counting your identifying information and Work Cited listing, so the .docx file must include at least four pages.  It should expand significantly on the ground covered in your original, two-page ME.
  • The expansion in length from two to 4 pages may be achieved in two ways: by adding additional body paragraphs to the original ME, or by starting fresh and writing all new paragraphs. You are NOT required to retain the body paragraphs from your original ME.  If you choose to keep the body paragraphs from your ME in the longer graded essay, you need not keep them in the same order, and your "new ground" body paragraphs can be wherever they best serve your argument --  you are not obliged to tack the new paragraphs on at the end of the original two pages.  Organize your ideas into paragraphs in the order that best demonstrates the validity of your claims -- which should expand upon the more limited claims you could make in the two-page ME.
  • All this to say: you can "grow" the original two-page ME by 2 pages or radically rethink it as you see fit. You have the option of reformulating the ideas in the original ME and regrouping them into different paragraphs, or even of changing your focus and starting the graded essay from scratch -- as long as your ME is still focused on the same medieval text.  The goal is to demonstrate your understanding of the medieval text as it was presented in lectures:  why we read it, and how close reading suggests the purpose for which it was created and the message it conveyed to its target audience. 
  • Strive for the same density of textual analysis as is called for in an ME: quote and analyze at least 2-3 passages from the medieval text in shorter body paragraphs (1/2 page or less in length); weave at least 3-4 quotations from the medieval text into longer body paragraphs (over 1/2 page in length).  All quotations should be followed by a parenthetical reference containing the page number on which the quote is found, or the inclusive line numbers for verse passages with numbered lines.
  • Your Opening Statement of Claims and Conclusion should be revised to clearly and explicitly articulate the full scope of the claims you are making in your longer graded essay -- including the new ground you have covered that was not included in the original, 2-page ME.  As with an ME, your introduction should include background information that is essential to your argument, including but not limited to date, authorship, target audience, generic conventions, and definitions of terms that are central to your analysis.
  • NOTE 1:  you are NOT required to follow the substantive suggestions made by your assigned Peer Reviewer as you revise and expand (or radically rethink and rework) your ME, but you ARE required to read and consider that feedback.  DO edit your graded essay carefully for mechanical, stylistic, or formatting errors pointed out by your Peer Reviewer or that you notice when using the Essay Evaluation Checklist. 

  • NOTE 2: While your Peer Reviewer's feedback should be helpful, it is YOUR essay, and YOU are ultimately responsible for both its content and the quality of the writing.  Edit your work carefully for the organizational, stylistic and mechanical issues listed on the Essay Evaluation Checklist; you are expected to proofread carefully and to  avoid the errors on the checklist, whether or not they were pointed out by your Peer Reviewer.


GWR CERTIFICATION PORTFOLIO: If you wish to receive GWR certification for this class, you must submit the following documents to me, as attachments to a single email with the subject line "ENGL 330 GWR Portfolio," no later than midnight on Monday, 11/30/20Your GWR Portfolio should consist of:
  1. Your final 4-page essay (the same .docx file submitted to Dr. Schwartz for grading on Sunday, 11/22/20)
  2. The peer-edited version of your ME 2 or ME 3 which you revised and expanded as your graded essay (the .PDF file sent to you by your Peer Editor)
  3. What you feel is the strongest set of Peer-Editing Feedback you prepared for a classmate (the same .PDF file you sent the ME author and Dr. Schwartz)
  4. A one-page Personal Reflection on how the writing and revision assignments for this class, as well as the peer-editing you have done for classmates, has helped you improve as a writer.  This personal reflection should offer a self-assessment of your progress, mention the items included in your portfolio, and explain how they contributed to your growth as a writer. This Personal Reflection should be submitted as a one-page .docx file saved under the filename "[yourlastname]330GWRportfolioF20.docx"; please be sure to include at the top of the page: your name, the class number, and the date of submission.

    While I cannot  guarantee your success, I anticipate that everyone trying for GWR certification in ENGL 330 will receive it -- provided of course that you follow Portfolio Guidelines and earn a grade of C or better in the class -- something that should be true of everyone who has attended class regularly and submitted all assignments. 

    Please note that while the GWR Portfolio submission deadline is Monday, 11/30/20, you may submit your GWR Portfolio at any time after you have completed your Final Essay and submitted it for grading.  I will let you know that you have submitted a passing portfolio as soon as I have assessed it so that you will know whether you have received GWR as soon as your final course grade is posted.  I truly appreciate your hard work and engagement in ENGL 330!  I hope that this procedure will help alleviate any anxiety you may have about the GWR as we near the end of this unprecedentedly difficult quarter.

   


 
Week 9 (November 11-12)
Day 1 (W 11/11/20)   NO CLASS -- UNIVERSITY HOLIDAY (VETERANS DAY).  If you are in ROTC or have been in the military, THANK YOU for your service! 
PLEASE NOTE: the assigned readings for Friday's class are three tales, read in translation only; the LECTURE WILL MOVE QUICKLY, so please be sure to have completed all assigned readings!
Day 2 (F 11/13/20): Chaucer's Canterbury Tales 3: The Knight's Tale, The Miller's Tale, and The Shipman's Tale.

 
[as needed:
continued discussion of the General Prologue ]

Lecture Topics: The Knight's Tale and the Miller's Tale as polar opposites in their handling of the love triangle and the theme of a woman's agency and choice of her partners in love relationships; the Miller's desire to "quyte" (pay back, respond to, answer) the Knight's Tale; the Knight and the Miller as personified embodiments of their respective genres, the Romance of Antiquity and the Fabliau; the Shipman's Tale as another example of the Fabliau genre, and as evidence of Chaucer's revision process (since it is clear that Chaucer originally intended this tale for the Wife of Bath).

Required Primary Readings:

  • Chaucer's Knight's Tale, Miller's Prologue, Miller's Tale, and Shipman's Tale, in David Wright's modern translation (only). 
    NOTE: This Oxford World Classics textbook is available electronically on the Kennedy Library Website; the required readings are found pp. 25-99 and 342-353, but you will likely find it easier to access the .PDF files of each of these required readings on e-reserve in the Required Readings folder on Canvas.

Required Contextual Readings:

  • Review the portraits of today's story-tellers, the Knight, the Miller, and the Shipman, in the David Wright translation of the General Prologue.

Required Background Readings:

  • Online Study Guides for The Knight's Tale and The Miller's Tale.
  • Helen Cooper's chart on the Structure of the Knight's Tale, on e-reserve in the Required Readings folder on Canvas.
      
Text Info:
  • The Knight's Tale is a romance, but note that it was written in English, not French.  By the late 14th-century, the term "romance" no longer means "a narrative in the French vernacular"; it refers to a particular genre, a story which typically has a long-ago-and-far-away setting, aristocratic characters, plots involving both love and warfare, and a happy ending.  Romances often draw on the conventions of courtly love, depicting lovers who suffer from lovesickness and express their feelings in flowery speeches.  A common plot line is the winning of a bride by a brave knight through chivalric prowess.  The Knight's Tale was originally written ca. 1384-5, before Chaucer began work on the Canterbury Tales collection. (In the Prologue to the Legend of Good Women, written ca. 1385, he refers to this poem as Palamon and Arcite.)  Chaucer apparently considered this "translatio romance" to be an appropriate tale for his Knight and a fitting beginning to the Canterbury Tales as a whole when he chose to incorporate it into his frame narrative collection. The primary source of the Knight's Tale is an Italian poem by Boccaccio called Il Teseida (the "Story of Theseus"); other sources include Boethius's Consolation of Philosophy (a 5th-century Latin philosophical work which Chaucer had previously translated into English); the Thebaid (a Latin work about Thebes written by Statius in the first century); and the Romance of Thebes (an anonymous mid-twelfth-century French "translatio" of the Thebaid written, like the Romance of Eneas, for the Anglo-Norman court of Henry II and Eleanor of Aquitaine).
  • Chaucer's Miller's Tale is a fabliau, a French genre most popular in the 13th century that is adapted into English by Chaucer.  These short humorous narratives are characterized by a "here and now" setting (not the "long ago and far away" of romance); middle-class characters (not the aristocrats of romance); earthiness of tone and subject matter; an emphasis on the body in all its physicality -- sex, defecation, farting, the appetites -- rather than the emotions or the spiritual; and coarse language (rather than the flowery language often used in romance). Fabliaux (plural form) tend to flout authorities of all sorts and are frequently subversive. Characters are often "tricksters" admired for their cleverness; a common theme is the gleeful adultery of a repressed wife and a clever cleric. (For fuller information, see the beginning of the  Miller's Tale study guide; some Old French fabliaux are on e-reserve in the Supplemental Readings folder in PolyLearn.)
  • All 82 manuscripts of the Canterbury Tales begin with the General Prologue, followed by the Knight's Tale, the Miller's Tale, the Reeve's Tale and the Cook's Tale, which are are "glued together" by the dialogue between them.  Critics refer to this "chunk" of text as "Fragment 1."
LOOKING AHEAD 1:
  • The final open book, unlimited time "Study Quiz 4," on Chaucer's Canterbury Tales and Medieval Theatre (the mystery play The Second Shepherds' Play and the Morality play Everyman) will be do no later than midnight on Monday, November 23.  NOTE:  this due date has been changed so that you do not have two assignments due on the same day, and so that you can concentrate first on on your Graded 3-4-Page essay (due on Sunday, 11/22/20). 

LOOKING AHEAD 2:

  • ME 4, on 1-2 of Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, is due by midnight on Sunday, 11/29/20.  NOTE: do not forget to submit your two Classmate Responses to ME 4, which are required to receive credit for your ME 4; be sure to submit them no later than midnight on MONDAY 11/30/20.  Please note that you will have only one day to submit your CRs (from Sunday to Monday) to allow my Grader (who is also a student with exams and papers due exam week) to tabulate your postings and submit them to me.

LOOKING AHEAD 3:

  • Your GRADED 3-4 page ESSAY, worth 20% of the final course grade, is due via email attachment to Dr. Schwartz no later than midnight on SUNDAY, 11/22/20. The graded essay may be a significant expansion of your ME 2 or ME 3; alternatively, it can explore other issues in the same medieval text that was the focus of your ME 2 or ME 3.  Keep in mind that because this essay replaces the essay component of a standard exam, it must articulate (in your own words) your understanding of the issues in the medieval text that were pointed to in lectures. If appropriate, you may choose to expand your ME 2 or ME 3 by bringing in analysis of a second text.
  • Like an ME, your graded essay should be grounded in close reading:  your textually based analysis must cite and explain passages from the medieval text to demonstrate the validity of clearly articulated claims about the medieval text.  Because the graded essay stands in for Exam Essays, it should demonstrate your grasp of ideas about the medieval text that were covered in class lectures. 
  • There are no separate guidelines for the graded 3-4 page essay since it is the same kind of assignment as a 2-page ME, from which it differs only in length and scope.  It should be formatted in the same way as an ME, so you may use the ME Template for basic formatting.  Please include your name, discussion group number,  and the due dateSINGLE SPACED, at the upper left of the first page. The title line should NOT begin "ME 1:" or "ME 2:" since this graded, 3-4-page Midterm Exam Essay is no longer a Mini-Essay; put your title only on the title line.  After the first page, number pages by using a header containing your last name and the page number.  
  • Unlike the essay section on an in-class Midterm Exam, there is no set of prompts to choose from for the graded 3-4 page essay, since it is frequently a revision and expansion of one of your 2-page MEs. The graded essay must be broader in scope than the original ME, as it should cover new ground (while focusing on the same medieval text that was the focus of the ME).  The essay should be at LEAST three full pages in length not counting your identifying information and Work Cited listing, so the .docx file must include at least four pages.  It should expand significantly on the ground covered in your original, two-page ME.
  • The expansion in length from two to 3-4 pages may be achieved in two ways: by adding additional body paragraphs to the original ME, or by starting fresh and writing all new paragraphs. You are NOT required to retain the body paragraphs from your original ME.  If you choose to keep the body paragraphs from your ME in the longer graded essay, you need not keep them in the same order, and your "new ground" body paragraphs can be wherever they best serve your argument --  you are not obliged to tack the new paragraphs on at the end of the original two pages.  Organize your ideas into paragraphs in the order that best demonstrates the validity of your claims -- which should expand upon the more limited claims you could make in the two-page ME.
  • All this to say: you can "grow" the original two-page ME by 1-2 pages or radically rethink it as you see fit. You have the option of reformulating the ideas in the original ME and regrouping them into different paragraphs, or even of changing your focus and starting the graded essay from scratch -- as long as your ME is still focused on the same medieval text.  The goal is to demonstrate your understanding of the medieval text as it was presented in lectures:  why we read it, and how close reading suggests the purpose for which it was created and the message it conveyed to its target audience. 
  • Strive for the same density of textual analysis as is called for in an ME: quote and analyze at least 2-3 passages from the medieval text in shorter body paragraphs (1/2 page or less in length); weave at least 3-4 quotations from the medieval text into longer body paragraphs (over 1/2 page in length).  All quotations should be followed by a parenthetical reference containing the page number on which the quote is found, or the inclusive line numbers for verse passages with numbered lines.
  • Your Opening Statement of Claims and Conclusion should be revised to clearly and explicitly articulate the full scope of the claims you are making in your longer graded essay -- including the new ground you have covered that was not included in the original, 2-page ME.  As with an ME, your introduction should include background information that is essential to your argument, including but not limited to date, authorship, target audience, generic conventions, and definitions of terms that are central to your analysis.
  • NOTE 1:  you are NOT required to follow the substantive suggestions made by your assigned Peer Reviewer as you revise and expand (or radically rethink and rework) your ME, but you ARE required to read and consider that feedback.  DO edit your graded essay carefully for mechanical, stylistic, or formatting errors pointed out by your Peer Reviewer or that you notice when using the Essay Evaluation Checklist. 

  • NOTE 2: While your Peer Reviewer's feedback should be helpful, it is YOUR essay, and YOU are ultimately responsible for both its content and the quality of the writing.  Edit your work carefully for the organizational, stylistic and mechanical issues listed on the Essay Evaluation Checklist; you are expected to proofread carefully and to  avoid the errors on the checklist, whether or not they were pointed out by your Peer Reviewer.

 

Submission Guidelines:

  • Save your Graded 3-4 page Essay as a .docx file under the file name "[your Last Name]330GradedEssayF20.docx"
  • NOTE:  a .docx text is required 1) so that your essay can be added to the database of previously submitted essays used to check for possible cases of plagiarism; and 2) to ensure that I can open and print out the file.
  • Email me your  final essay as a .docx file attachment by midnight on Saturday, 11/21/20. The subject line of the email should read "ENGL 330-01 Graded Essay." (No need to include your last name unless you are emailing me from an account other than your Cal Poly email and your full name is not listed as sender.
  • Do NOT post your graded Essay to your PolyLearn Discussion Group. Graded assignments should be shared only with Dr. Schwartz.
GWR CERTIFICATION PORTFOLIO: If you wish to receive GWR certification for this class, you must submit the following documents to me, as attachments to a single email with the subject line "330 GWR Portfolio," no later than midnight on Monday, 11/30/20.  Your GWR Portfolio should consist of:
  1. Your final 4-page essay (the same .docx file submitted to Dr. Schwartz for grading on Sunday, 11/22/20)
  2. The peer-edited version of your ME 2 or ME 3 which you revised and expanded as your graded essay (the .PDF file sent to you by your Peer Editor)
  3. What you feel is the strongest set of Peer-Editing Feedback you prepared for a classmate (the same .PDF file you sent the ME author and Dr. Schwartz)
  4. A one-page Personal Reflection on how the writing and revision assignments for this class, as well as the peer-editing you have done for classmates, has helped you improve as a writer.  This personal reflection should offer a self-assessment of your progress, mention the items included in your portfolio, and explain how they contributed to your growth as a writer. This Personal Reflection should be submitted as a one-page .docx file saved under the filename "[yourlastname]330GWRportfolioF20.docx"; please be sure to include at the top of the page: your name, the class number, and the date of submission.

    While I cannot  guarantee your success, I anticipate that everyone trying for GWR certification in ENGL 330 will receive it -- provided of course that you follow Portfolio Guidelines and earn a grade of C or better in the class -- something that should be true of everyone who has attended class regularly and submitted all assignments. 

    Please note that while the GWR Portfolio submission deadline is Monday, 11/30/20, you may submit your GWR Portfolio at any time after you have completed your Final Essay and submitted it for grading.  I will let you know that you have submitted a passing portfolio as soon as I have assessed it so that you will know whether you have received GWR as soon as your final course grade is posted.  I truly appreciate your hard work and engagement in ENGL 330!  I hope that this procedure will help alleviate any anxiety you may have about the GWR as we near the end of this unprecedentedly difficult quarter.

Week 10 (November 18-20)
Day 1 (W 11/18/20): Chaucer's Canterbury Tales 3: The Wife of Bath's Prologue and Tale
 
[As needed: complete discussion of texts assigned for last class ]

Required Background Readings:

Required Primary Readings:

  • Review the Portrait of the Wife of Bath in the General Prologue to the Canterbury Tales (NA pp. 254-255, lines GP 447-478; David Wright's translation, pp. 14-15, available electronically on the Kennedy Library website, and on e-reserve in the Required Readings folder on Canvas).
  • Review The Shipman's Tale, which was originally intended for the Wife of Bath (assigned for last class meeting);
  • NEW READINGS: The Wife of Bath's Prologue and Tale: read the full David Wright translation,pp. 150-181, as well as the following lines in the NA (pp. 282-310): WBP lines 1-7, 65-78, 121-156, 175-180, 199-203, 459-462, 487-496, 509-536, 570-577, 593-614, 633-642, 672-702, 794-831.  WBT lines 863-869, 888-918, 989-1005, 1011-1022, 1043-1072, 1106-1122, 1156-1164, 1219-1250.

TEXT INFO:

  • The Wife of Bath's Prologue is a literary confession or "apology," a first-person narrative in which a character explains his or her character and motivation. (Note that despite the modern connotations, these terms do not imply the speaker's sense of guilt or regret about the behavior described.)
  • The Wife of Bath's Tale is a miniature Arthurian romance, with a setting in the distant past, aristocratic characters, magical events, and a happy ending. The structure is circular, beginning and ending at Arthur's court, where a knight undertakes a quest and to which he returns when the quest is complete.

Day 2 (F 11/20/20): LAST CLASS MEETING.

Topic 1: The End of the Canterbury Tales.

Required Background and Primary Readings:
  • Introduction to The Parson's Tale and Chaucer's Retraction, NA 340, and "Close of the Canterbury Tales" portion of the General Prologue study guide.
  • Chaucer's text, NA 340-343, and modern translation, of The Parson's Prologue, the summary of the Parson's Tale, and Chaucer's Retraction (translation found in the Oxford World Classics translation of the Canterbury Tales, trans. by David Wright, pp. 470-482 ;.PDFs are on e-reserve in the Required Readings section of Canvas, or you can access the full Oxford World Classics textbook online -- Cal Poly log-in required).

Topic 2: The End of the Middle Ages: the Morality Play Everyman

Required Readings:

  • Background: NA 18 (paragraph beginning "Social, economic and literary life. . ."); NA 507-8 (headnote to Everyman); online reading: Everyman study guide; review Introduction to Medieval Allegory
  • Primary Text:  Everyman, NA 508-29.
     
TEXT INFO:
  • Recall that: The Canterbury Tales (taken as a whole) is a "frame narrative" collection on which Chaucer worked during the last 14 years of his life (ca. 1386-1400).  Use this blanket date for all Canterbury Tales selections EXCEPT the Knight's Tale
  • Recall that: A "frame narrative" is a work in which a group of story-tellers tell stories to each other. The individual stories that they tell are embedded within the narrative framework, which in the case of the Canterbury Tales is a pilgrimage to visit the shrine of St. Thomas â Becket at Canterbury Cathedral.
  • Recall that: The General Prologue to the Canterbury Tales sets up the narrative framework of the collection.  It also functions independently as an example of the medieval genre known as Estates Satire. (See the online reading The Medieval Estates.) 
  • Recall that: All 82 manuscripts of the Canterbury Tales begin with the General Prologue, followed by the Knight's Tale, the Miller's Tale, the Reeve's Tale and the Cook's Tale, which are are "glued together" by the dialogue between them.  Critics refer to this "chunk" of text as "Fragment 1."
  • NEW: The Parson's Tale is a "penitential treatise," a genre which teaches people how to repent for their sins so that they will be prepared for Judgment Day and can hope for salvation rather than damnation.  We are reading: the full text of the Parson's Prologue, in which the Parson redefines the pilgrimage as a metaphorical journey to "celestial . . . Jerusalem" (i.e. salvation); the summary of the Parson's Tale; and Chaucer's "Retraction."  All 82 manuscripts of the Canterbury Tales end with this "chunk" of texts, which critics refer to as "Fragment 10."
  • Recall that The Second Shepherds' Play was written ca. 1475 by an unknown author referred to as the Wakefield Master.  This Mystery Play connects the scriptural account of Christ's Nativity and the Angel's Annunciation to the Shepherds of Christ's Birth to the lives of ordinary 15th-century people. It is written in "thirteeners," 13-line rhyming stanzas with the rhyme scheme ABAB ABAB CDDDC, in which the first "C" rhyme line is frequently shorter than the other lines.
  • Recall that: "Mystery Plays"are dramatized scripture used to teach salvation history to the illiterate. They were performed by Guilds (something like a modern trade union crossed with the Rotary Club). To be effective, a Mystery Play needed to be entertaining, but its underlying purpose was serious: to engage the interest and understanding of the audience in order to help them be better Christians.
  • Recall that: Mystery plays came in CYCLES: a series of plays which together were meant to present ALL OF SACRED HISTORY, from the Creation of the World through the End of Time (the Last Judgment), with particular emphasis on human history: the Fall of mankind and how Original Sin was redeemed through the Nativity, Incarnation and Passion of Christ.
  • NEW: Everyman is a morality play by an unknown author which may have been adapted from a Flemish original.  It is in English rhymed verse and dates from after 1485.  Morality plays were popular in the late 15th and early 16th centuries, and Everyman was performed well into the period commonly referred to as the Renaissance. 
  • A morality play is dramatized allegory. The usual subject is the saving of a human soul, and the central figure is Man in the sense of humanity in general (e.g. Everyman). In a typical morality play, the forces of Good and Evil are engaged in a struggle for the soul of an individual, a struggle called a psychomachia (Greek for "war over [or in] the soul"). Morality plays spoke to medieval man's anxiety about being prepared for death, or "dying well"; they offer their audience a sort of ars moriendi (Latin for "the art of dying [well]"). Thus, while the timespan covered by a cycle of mystery plays is literally all of sacred history--from Creation, to the Fall (eating the apple in the Garden of Eden), to other Old Testament events (e.g. Noah's Flood), to the New Testament events of Christ's Incarnation, Passion and Resurrection, to the Last Judgment and the end of time-- the timespan of a morality play is one human life.

REMINDER 1:
  • The final open book, unlimited time "Study Quiz 4," on Chaucer's Canterbury Tales and Medieval Theatre (the mystery play The Second Shepherds' Play and the Morality play Everyman) will NOT be due on Monday, November 23.  NOTE:  I will alert you to the new due date when I notify that Study Quiz 4 is available on Canvas, but it is likely to be due by midnight on Sunday, 11/29/20 (the end of Thanksgiving break, and the night before exam week starts).


REMINDER 2: GRADED ESSAY
  • Your GRADED 3-4 page ESSAY, worth 20% of the final course grade, is due via email attachment to Dr. Schwartz no later than midnight on SUNDAY, 11/22/20. The graded essay may be a significant expansion of your ME 2 or ME 3; alternatively, it can explore other issues in the same medieval text that was the focus of your ME 2 or ME 3.  Keep in mind that because this essay replaces the essay component of a standard exam, it must articulate (in your own words) your understanding of the issues in the medieval text that were pointed to in lectures. 
  • Like an ME, your graded essay should be grounded in close reading:  your textually based analysis must cite and explain passages from the medieval text to demonstrate the validity of clearly articulated claims about the medieval text.  Because the graded essay stands in for Exam Essays, it should demonstrate your grasp of ideas about the medieval text that were covered in class lectures. 
  • There are no separate guidelines for the graded 3-4 page essay since it is the same kind of assignment as a 2-page ME, from which it differs only in length and scope.  It should be formatted in the same way as an ME, so you may use the ME Template for basic formatting.  Please include your name, discussion group number,  and the due dateSINGLE SPACED, at the upper left of the first page. The title line should NOT begin "ME 1:" or "ME 2:" since this graded, 3-4-page Midterm Exam Essay is no longer a Mini-Essay; put your title only on the title line.  After the first page, number pages by using a header containing your last name and the page number.  
  • Unlike the essay section on an in-class Midterm Exam, there is no set of prompts to choose from for the graded 3-4 page essay, since it is frequently a revision and expansion of one of your 2-page MEs. The graded essay must be broader in scope than the original ME, as it should cover new ground (while focusing on the same medieval text that was the focus of the ME).  The essay should be at LEAST three full pages in length not counting your identifying information and Work Cited listing, so the .docx file must include at least four pages.  It should expand significantly on the ground covered in your original, two-page ME.
  • The expansion in length from two to 3-4 pages may be achieved in two ways: by adding additional body paragraphs to the original ME, or by starting fresh and writing all new paragraphs. You are NOT required to retain the body paragraphs from your original ME.  If you choose to keep the body paragraphs from your ME in the longer graded essay, you need not keep them in the same order, and your "new ground" body paragraphs can be wherever they best serve your argument --  you are not obliged to tack the new paragraphs on at the end of the original two pages.  Organize your ideas into paragraphs in the order that best demonstrates the validity of your claims -- which should expand upon the more limited claims you could make in the two-page ME.
  • All this to say: you can "grow" the original two-page ME by 1-2 pages or radically rethink it as you see fit. You have the option of reformulating the ideas in the original ME and regrouping them into different paragraphs, or even of changing your focus and starting the graded essay from scratch -- as long as your ME is still focused on the same medieval text.  The goal is to demonstrate your understanding of the medieval text as it was presented in lectures:  why we read it, and how close reading suggests the purpose for which it was created and the message it conveyed to its target audience. 
  • Strive for the same density of textual analysis as is called for in an ME: quote and analyze at least 2-3 passages from the medieval text in shorter body paragraphs (1/2 page or less in length); weave at least 3-4 quotations from the medieval text into longer body paragraphs (over 1/2 page in length).  All quotations should be followed by a parenthetical reference containing the page number on which the quote is found, or the inclusive line numbers for verse passages with numbered lines.
  • Your Opening Statement of Claims and Conclusion should be revised to clearly and explicitly articulate the full scope of the claims you are making in your longer graded essay -- including the new ground you have covered that was not included in the original, 2-page ME.  As with an ME, your introduction should include background information that is essential to your argument, including but not limited to date, authorship, target audience, generic conventions, and definitions of terms that are central to your analysis.
  • NOTE 1:  you are NOT required to follow the substantive suggestions made by your assigned Peer Reviewer as you revise and expand (or radically rethink and rework) your ME, but you ARE required to read and consider that feedback.  DO edit your graded essay carefully for mechanical, stylistic, or formatting errors pointed out by your Peer Reviewer or that you notice when using the Essay Evaluation Checklist. 

  • NOTE 2: While your Peer Reviewer's feedback should be helpful, it is YOUR essay, and YOU are ultimately responsible for both its content and the quality of the writing.  Edit your work carefully for the organizational, stylistic and mechanical issues listed on the Essay Evaluation Checklist; you are expected to proofread carefully and to  avoid the errors on the checklist, whether or not they were pointed out by your Peer Reviewer.

 

Submission Guidelines:

  • Save your Graded 3-4 page Essay as a .docx file under the file name "[your Last Name]330GradedEssayF20.docx"
  • NOTE:  a .docx text is required 1) so that your essay can be added to the database of previously submitted essays used to check for possible cases of plagiarism; and 2) to ensure that I can open and print out the file.
  • Email me your Midterm Exam Essay as a .docx file attachment by midnight on Saturday, 11/21/20. The subject line of the email should read "ENGL 330 Graded Essay."
  • Do NOT post your graded Midterm Exam Essay to your PolyLearn Discussion Group. Graded assignments should be shared only with Dr. Schwartz.

LOOKING AHEAD (OUT OF CLASS WRITING):
your final, ungraded ME 4, on 1-2 readings from The Canterbury Tales, is due no later than midnight on SUNDAY 11/29/20.  NOTE:  the CRs for this final ME are due by midnight on Monday, 11/20, one day earlier than usual, so they do not drag into exam week (and because my Graders, who are also taking exams and writing final papers, need to be able to complete their Assignment Tracking).  Your two Classmate Responses to ME 4 are required to receive credit for ME 4; they must be submitted no later than midnight on MONDAY 11/30/20Please note that you will have only one day to submit your CRs (from Sunday to Monday) .

REMINDER 2 (looking ahead):
  • ME 4, on 1-2 of Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, is due by midnight on Sunday, 11/29/20.  NOTE: the two CRs for ME 4 are due by midnight on Monday, 11/30/20, one day earlier than usual, so they do not drag into exam week (and because my Graders, who are also taking exams and writing final papers, need to be able to complete their Assignment Tracking).  The two Classmate Responses required to receive credit for ME 4 are due no later than midnight on MONDAY 11/30/20.  Please note that you will have only one day to submit your CRs (from Sunday to Monday) .
  • Please use the ME Template on Canvas for correct formatting.  Skip a line following your single-spaced identifying information and put, centered, ME 4: Your Title, which should include (but not simply be) the title of the work(s) you are writing on.
     


GWR CERTIFICATION PORTFOLIO: If you wish to receive GWR certification for this class, you must submit the following documents to me, as attachments to a single email with the subject line "330 GWR Portfolio," no later than midnight on Monday, 11/30/20.  Your GWR Portfolio should consist of:
  1. Your final 4-page essay (the same .docx file submitted to Dr. Schwartz for grading on Sunday, 11/22/20)
  2. The peer-edited version of your ME 2 or ME 3 which you revised and expanded as your graded essay (the .PDF file sent to you by your Peer Editor)
  3. What you feel is the strongest set of Peer-Editing Feedback you prepared for a classmate (the same .PDF file you sent the ME author and Dr. Schwartz)
  4. A one-page Personal Reflection on how the writing and revision assignments for this class, as well as the peer-editing you have done for classmates, has helped you improve as a writer.  This personal reflection should offer a self-assessment of your progress, mention the items included in your portfolio, and explain how they contributed to your growth as a writer. This Personal Reflection should be submitted as a one-page .docx file saved under the filename "[yourlastname]330GWRportfolioF20.docx"; please be sure to include at the top of the page: your name, the class number, and the date of submission.

    While I cannot  guarantee your success, I anticipate that everyone trying for GWR certification in ENGL 330 will receive it -- provided of course that you follow Portfolio Guidelines and earn a grade of C or better in the class -- something that should be true of everyone who has attended class regularly and submitted all assignments. 

    Please note that while the GWR Portfolio submission deadline is Monday, 11/30/20, you may submit your GWR Portfolio at any time after you have completed your Final Essay and submitted it for grading.  I will let you know that you have submitted a passing portfolio as soon as I have assessed it so that you will know whether you have received GWR as soon as your final course grade is posted.  I truly appreciate your hard work and engagement in ENGL 330!  I hope that this procedure will help alleviate any anxiety you may have about the GWR as we near the end of this unprecedentedly difficult quarter.



Week 11 (NO CLASS)
NO CLASS -- HAPPY THANKSGIVING!

OUT OF CLASS WRITING: your ungraded ME 4 on is due no later than midnight on SUNDAY 11/29/20 (be sure to follow the usual submission guidelines).  NOTE: the two CRS for this final ME are due one day earlier than usual so they do not drag into exam week (and because my Graders, who are also taking exams and writing final papers, need to be able to complete their Assignment Tracking).  Your two Classmate Responses required to receive credit for ME 4 must be submitted no later than midnight on MONDAY 11/30/20Please note that you will have only one day to submit your CRs (from Sunday to Monday)
GWR CERTIFICATION PORTFOLIO: If you wish to receive GWR certification for this class, you must submit the following documents to me, as attachments to a single email with the subject line "330 GWR Portfolio," no later than midnight on Monday, 11/30/20.  Your GWR Portfolio should consist of:
  1. Your final 4-page essay (the same .docx file submitted to Dr. Schwartz for grading on Sunday, 11/22/20)
  2. The peer-edited version of your ME 2 or ME 3 which you revised and expanded as your graded essay (the .PDF file sent to you by your Peer Editor)
  3. What you feel is the strongest set of Peer-Editing Feedback you prepared for a classmate (the same .PDF file you sent the ME author and Dr. Schwartz)
  4. A one-page Personal Reflection on how the writing and revision assignments for this class, as well as the peer-editing you have done for classmates, has helped you improve as a writer.  This personal reflection should offer a self-assessment of your progress, mention the items included in your portfolio, and explain how they contributed to your growth as a writer. This Personal Reflection should be submitted as a one-page .docx file saved under the filename "[yourlastname]330GWRportfolioF20.docx"; please be sure to include at the top of the page: your name, the class number, and the date of submission.

    While I cannot  guarantee your success, I anticipate that everyone trying for GWR certification in ENGL 330 will receive it -- provided of course that you follow Portfolio Guidelines and earn a grade of C or better in the class -- something that should be true of everyone who has attended class regularly and submitted all assignments. 

    Please note that while the GWR Portfolio submission deadline is Monday, 11/30/20, you may submit your GWR Portfolio at any time after you have completed your Final Essay and submitted it for grading.  I will let you know that you have submitted a passing portfolio as soon as I have assessed it so that you will know whether you have received GWR as soon as your final course grade is posted.  I truly appreciate your hard work and engagement in ENGL 330!  I hope that this procedure will help alleviate any anxiety you may have about the GWR as we near the end of this unprecedentedly difficult quarter.

Contents of this and all linked pages Copyright Debora B. Schwartz, 1996-2020.
[extra class meeting would be NPT & Pardoner]