English 380 - Love and Death: The Tristan Tradition
(Spring, 2018)


painting by J. W. Waterhouse
                1916
Class meetings: T/Th 2:10-4:00 PM, Rm. 2-13
Office: 47-35G, tel. 756-2636
Office Hours: M 8:10-10:00 AM, T/Th 12:30-1:30 PM, and by appt.
[NOTE:
some office hours may be held in library; location changes will be posted in Announcements on PolyLearn]

Dr. Debora B. Schwartz 
e-mail: dschwart@calpoly.edu
Main English Office:  756-2597
Wyeth King Mark Slew Sir
                Tristram (1917)

Calendar of AssignmentsPLEASE NOTE that the on-line calendar (not any print-out you may make) is authoritative.  Assignments may be modified in the course of the quarter.  Check the on-line calendar regularly (before each class) to ensure you are completing the correct assignment.



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COURSE INFORMATION: BACKGROUND PAGES: CAL POLY RESOURCES: WEB RESOURCES: FILMS:  THE OPERA: 

PREREQUISITES: GE area A (esp. expository writing, e.g. ENGL 134, and reasoning, argumentation and writing, e.g. ENGL 145); AND GE area C1 (a 200-level literature class, e.g. ENGL 230 or 231or 240 or 251 or 252 or 253).  Students enrolled in this class are assumed to have the basic writing, argumentation and analytic skills taught in the Prerequisite classes and to have prior experience in reading and analyzing literature at the 200-level.

A WRITING-INTENSIVE, G.E. AREA C4 CLASS.  As a writing-intensive class, ENGL 380 requires a minimum of 3000 words of writing over the course of the quarter, and 50% of the course grade must be based on writing assignments.  As a G.E. area C4 class, it provides historical perspective on one or more significant literary periods; covers a range of literary genres and conventions; helps you understand both individual works and their relationship to the social, cultural, and historical context in which they were written, including attention to relevant issues of gender and diversity; and aims to foster an appreciation of the connections between literary works and non-verbal forms such as the visual and performing arts.  Course readings, lectures and writing assignments aim to help you develop the skills necessary to read with insight, engagement, and detachment; to analyze and evaluate works from cultures which are unfamiliar to you; and to write clear, efffective textual analysis that is firmly grounded in close reading of literary texts.

GWR:  As a C4 literature class, ENGL 380 may be taken by students wishing to fulfill the Graduate Writing Requirement (GWR).  However, please be aware that successful completion of the course does not guarantee GWR certification.  To achieve GWR certification, you must 1) have junior or senior standing; 2) pass the class with a grade of "C" or better (a C- is not adequate); and 3) write a GWR-Certifiable Essay on the essay portion of either the midterm or the final exam.  A GWR-certifiable essay must conform to the standards for formal analytic writing about literature:  a valid argument (appropiate and adequate content), logical organization, appropriate and adequate textual support, and reasonably correct mechanics (grammar, spelling, sentence structure, punctuation, etc.) and style.  See Tips for Writing a GWR-Certifiable Essay; consult the formerly used Paper Writing Guidelines and Essay Evaluation Sheet if you are unsure about the conventions of formal analytic writing about literature.

Mac Harshberger, [Mark] Watched
        Them as They Lay (1927 illustration to Bedier's Romance of
        Tristan and Iseult)Aubrey Beardsley, How Sir Tristram Drank of the Love Drink
        (1893)COURSE DESCRIPTION and OBJECTIVES:

ENGL 380, "Love and Death: The Tristan Tradition," is designed to introduce students to a highly influential medieval love story which has been eclipsed, in modern times, by the better known saga of Lancelot and Guenevere.  We will trace the development of the Tristan tradition from the middle ages to the 21st century, seeking to understand its ongoing appeal and to analyze the significance it has held for various periods and audiences.  Of particular interest will be the treatment of the adulterous triangle in each work and the author's characterization of the protagonists: Tristan, nephew to King Marc of Cornwall, and Isolde, lover of Tristan and Marc's queen.  Material considered will include artwork, film and an opera in addition to literary works -- romance and lai, modern poetry and fiction -- from the medieval period through the 21st century.  Students will refine their expository writing skills and practice writing analysis of literary texts and other art forms.
 

REQUIRED TEXTS:  Some required textbooks have been ordered and are available at the El Corral bookstore. The five textbooks are inexpensive paperbacks; VERY inexpensive copies can be found used at <bookfinder.com> or other online booksellers. Do NOT substitute another edition or translation for these textbooks:

Other required readings will be accessed electronically:  Online Readings are found in .HTML files accessible through links on this website and E-reserve readings in the form of .PDF files on "electronic reserve" in PolyLearn.  Please note that ALL required electronically accessed readings should be available to you in class either electronically or as printed out hard copies which should be placed in a course binder and BROUGHT WITH YOU TO CLASS. REQUIRED VIDEO SCREENINGS: We will also discuss several films which are on reserve for ENGL 380 at the Kennedy Library Circulation Desk:
James
              Franco and Sophia Myles in Kevin Reynolds's film Tristan
              and Isolde (2006) We will also discuss a DVD of "Extended Scenes" from Richard Wagner's Tristan und Isolde (the opera was composed 1857-59; the DVD presents excerpts from the 1976 production starring Jon Vickers and Roberta Knie, with the Montreal Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Franz-Paul Decker). 

These required films are the equivalent of readings and must be viewed prior to the class meeting at which they will be discussed. Group screening times will be arranged, or you can see them on your own time.  Copies of each required video are on Reserve for ENGL 380/459 in the Kennedy Library.

For each required film or video, you must submit a video worksheet electronically to your Polylearn Discussion Group and bring hard copy with you to the class meeting devoted to discussion of the film.  Your five video worksheets will not be graded as Written Work, but they should be completed with care as the information they ask you to compile is covered on the midterm and final exams.  Video worksheets factor into the Participation, Intellectual Engagement and Collaboration component of your final course grade:  each missing Video Worksheet counts as an Unexcused Absence.

NOTE 1: Videos and DVDs on reserve do not circulate outside the library; they must be screened in the library during normal library hours
NOTE 2:  Films which have been released on DVD may be available from NetFlix, Hulu, Amazon's View on Demand, and/or from local libraries or video stores. 
NOTE 3: Only selected scenes from the films will be screened in class; you must arrange to see the full video prior to the class meeting at which it will be discussed


Remember: While films are fun, you still have do do the readings!  You will not pass this course simply by watching the films.

Sidney
        Meteyard (1868-1947) Tristan and IsoldeCommunicating:

You are expected to have an email account and to check it regularly.  Important announcements will be sent via the Announcements section of PolyLearn to your Cal Poly email address, or I may contact you over the class email alias.  The class email alias is automatically generated using the email address of each enrolled student found in the Cal Poly Directory server. If your Cal Poly email account is NOT your preferred email address, you must

You are responsible for information sent over the alias (e.g. changes in class meetings or assignments), so be sure to check your email regularly.

PREPARATION: The assignment for each class meeting is found on the on-line calendar.  All readings (and video screenings, as applicable) are to be completed before the class meeting on the day for which they are assigned.  Unannounced quizzes will help monitor whether you are keeping up with assigned readings.  Quizzes will take place during approximately the first 10 minutes of class; expect them regularly. Please note that the on-line calendar (not any printout you make) is authoritative.  Assignments may be changed or modified in the course of the quarter.  Check the on-line calendar regularly (before each class meeting) to ensure that you are completing the correct assignment.

PARTICIPATION: ENGL 380 is designed to encourage YOUR interaction with and enjoyment of the works we are studying. The primary emphasis is on the texts, not historical background or scholarly debate, but some familiarity with the historical and cultural context is essential to an understanding of both medieval and modern works; this context will be provided through assigned background readings and lectures (and will be covered on quizzes and exams). 

While ENGL 380 is lecture-based, your regular presence will make a real difference in both your enjoyment of the material and the success of the class.  You are expected to interact with classmates both during in-class group discussion activities and through participation in a PolyLearn Discussion Group. YOUR active participation is essential to the success of ENGL 380! 

For these reasons . . .
 

Occasional absences due to personal
        circumstances are understandable . . . but not excused!REGULAR ATTENDANCE AND PARTICIPATION IN YOUR POLYLEARN DISCUSSION GROUP ARE REQUIRED. Due to the twice-weekly class meetings, any absence causes you to miss a substantial chunk of material. Regular and punctual attendance is required.  Please note that EVERY absence will affect the 20% of your course grade that is based on Participation, Intellectual Engagement, and Collaboration. Additionally, each missing Discussion Group posting will be treated like an unexcused Absence, and will affect the Participation, Intellectual Engagement and Collaboration component of your final grade, reducing it from a base of 4.0. 

If you have a valid reason for missing class (illness, family crisis, other unavoidable conflict), TELL ME IN WRITING.  A written explanation, either in an email or a  hard copy note signed by you, is required for an absence to count as excused; be sure to include your full name, the class number, the date(s) missed, and the reason(s) for the absence(s).   Any absence for which you do not provide a written explanation will be recorded as unexcused.  

PARTICIPATION, INTELLECTUAL ENGAGEMENT AND COLLABORATION GRADE CALCULATION:  

Each student starts out with a 4.0 (A) for Participation, Intellectual Engagement and Collaboration.  This component of your final grade drops by .1 for the first EXCUSED absence (4.0 to 3.9) and .2 for the second excused absence (3.9 to 3.7). Additionally, it drops .3 for the first UNEXCUSED absence; the Unexcused Absence penalty increases by .1 for each subsequent unexcused absence (from .3 to .4 to .5, etc.).   Please note that excused absences in excess of two (a full week, 10% of the class) count the same as unexcused absences.

Please note that only absences due to illness, family crisis, or circumstances which are truly beyond your control count as excused.  Deadlines for other courses, work conflicts, and job interviews are NOT valid reasons for missing class; you are responsible for keeping work commitments from conflicting with academic ones.  Exception:  if you are a graduating senior and must travel out of town for a final interview, ONE such absence will count as excused.  Please do not schedule local interviews or other appointments during class meetings. 

FOR AN ABSENCE TO BE EXCUSED, YOU MUST NOTIFY ME IN WRITING (email preferred).  On the subject line, put your class (ENGL 380), the word absence, and the day and date when you missed class (for example, "380 absence T 1/9/18").  Please repeat that information in the body of your email and provide a full explanation of the circumstances leading to your absence.  (I must understand why you needed to miss class in order to evaluate whether your absence qualifies as excused.)

Online Conversations; Engagement with the Texts and with Each Other.  Attendance is not the sole measure of your participation; I am also interested in your intellectual engagement with the material and your willingness to collaborate with your peers as demonstrated by regular participation in class discussion and/or in an online PolyLearn Discussion Group and through peer-editing of written assignments. 

While I notice and appreciate active participation in class discussions, I don't like to penalize students who are less comfortable speaking up in class.  I therefore measure Intellectual Engagement and Collaboration primarily based on out-of-class participation in your assigned Discussion Group Forum, to which you will submit 6 (ungraded) Mini-Essays (MEs), 12 (ungraded) Classmate Responses, and a series of five (ungraded) film analysis worksheets.  While these assignments are not graded as Written Work, each ungraded assignment that is not submitted to the Discussion Group Forum counts as an Unexcused Absence and will negatively impact the 20% of your course grade that is based on Participation, Intellectual Engagement, and Collaboration.

You will be assigned to a PolyLearn discussion group of 6-8 students to which you will post a series of six short (2-pg.) Mini-Essays (=MEs).  Each time a mini-essay ("ME") is assigned, you are expected to read the postings of the other members of your discussion group and to post a thoughtful response of one-two paragraphs to TWO of their ME postings. These Classmate Responses (=CRs) must include additional textual evidence from the work under discussion (other than the passages quoted in the ME to which you are responding).  Discussion group postings (both MEs and CRs) will be graded pass/fail only, but they will be factored along with Attendance into the 20% Participation, Intellectual Engagement and Collaboration component of your final course gradeMissing postings from your Polylearn Discussion Group (six Mini-Essays; twelve Classmate Responses; five film responses) COUNT AS UNEXCUSED ABSENCES

GRADED WORK:

Edmund Blair
        Leighton, Tristan and Isolde (1902)There will be periodic unannounced SCANTRON READING QUIZZES, so bring a scantron form (long enough for 15-20 questions) to each class meeting. Quizzes will monitor whether you are keeping up with assigned readings and/or film screenings; they are also intended to motivate you to learn background information as we go along and to serve as exam prep review sheets for the objective component of the midterm and final exams.  For this reason, you will keep quizzes to use as study guides and turn in only the scantron form; scantron scores will be reported in the Grades section of PolyLearn. 

Quizzes will include factual questions (names, titles, dates, genres, key terms) based on the Text/Film Information on the Calendar of Assignments and the information covered in required background readings and lectures.  There will also be IDs of and questions about key passages/scenes, names, motifs, and episodes from the assigned works.  If you learn the basic facts about each day's assigned works as we go along -- title of work(s); author, composer or director's name; date of composition / production; original language of work; genre and form of literary works; etc. -- you should do well on quizzes (and have a much easier task when it's time to review for exams!)

Quiz Grading: Each quiz will consist of at least 15 questions, but will be scored as if there were only 10 questions.  This means, in essence, that there are 5 or more Bonus questions on every quiz -- questions for which credit is awarded if you get them right, but no penalty is subtracted if you get them wrong.  Thus, answering 9 of 15 questions right on a "10-pt." quiz earns a score of  "90%"; answering 11 of 15 (or more) earns a score of "110%"; etc. Careful quiz prep will provide a cushion of EC points to balance any missed (or less than stellar) quizzes.  Students with a quiz average higher than 100% on the "10-pt." quizzes at the end of the quarter will receive grades in the A+ range (4.05 to 4.3 on a 4.0-scale) for the 15% of the final course grade based upon quizzes.  This quiz policy is designed to give students an incentive to keep up with readings and learn background material incrementally rather than trying to "cram" before exams.  It is not uncommon to finish the quarter with a quiz average well above "100%."



-- Detail, Aubrey Beardsley, How La Beale
        Isoud Wrote to Sir Tristram (1893)WRITING ASSIGNMENTS:  because ENGL 380 is a writing-intensive GE class, at least 50% of your course grade must be based on written work. The out-of-class writing assignments will be of two sorts: 

1) Six ungraded, two-page Polylearn Discussion Group Mini-Essays [= "MEs"] and twelve ungraded, 1-2 paragraph Classmate Responses [= "CRs"].  Ungraded Discussion Group postings count towards your Participation, Intellectual Engagement and Collaboration grade AND are REQUIRED in order to receive credit for GRADED PAPER, a 3-page revision/expansion of ONE 2-page ME (counts for 15% of your final course grade). Both MEs and CRs will require close reading of supporting quotations from assigned texts.

2) A GRADED 3-page paper which is a Revision/Expansion of ONE Discussion Board ME



MINI-ESSAY LOGISTICS:  Each student will be assigned to a Polylearn Discussion Group of 6-8 students.  You must post six two-page MEs to your Polylearn Discussion Group by no later than midnight on the dates indicated on the Calendar of Assignments (three MEs before and three after the midterm exam).

Based upon Discussion Group CR feedback, optional visits to the Writing Center, conversations with your instructor during an Office Hour, and/or peer editing sessions, you will revise one ME and submit it in hard copy for instructor feedback and a grade.   

-- MINI-ESSAY SPECIFICS: These short assignments are designed to make you attentive to details in the works under discussion.  They should be narrowly focused on topics that can be covered within the two-page target length.  The two-page target length will also oblige you to get to the point (lead with your conclusion; articulate your claims fully and explicitly; avoid broad statements and generalities; no "hook!"); to cut out unnecessary wordiness ("dead wood"); and to express your ideas clearly and concisely. 

MEs may be a response to a study question, an analysis of how a specific aspect of a work helps communicate an author or director's message or intentions, or a comparison of a specific element with an analogous element in a previously assigned work.  Regardless of the topic you choose, mini-essays MUST include analysis and interpretation of carefully chosen citations from the text.   An effective ME uses close reading of carefully chosen textual evidence to support an interpretive claim about the text or film.  You will need a narrow focus so that you can really "unpack" the language and/or images in the scenes and passages you discuss without exceeding the two-page target length.  Careful analysis of a single character, a specific relationship, a key image, or an important scene or speech may be enough to fill two pages.

MEs should present a logically organized argument to demonstrate the validity of an explicitly stated interpretive claim; don't simply describe characters or relationships or summarize the plot.  HINT: It may be fruitful to analyze how an element in the work differs from the way it appears in other versions of the Tristan story and to consider the effects of the transformation.  Or, explore how a key image or theme is presented in a limited number of passages or scenes.   Close attention to specific imagery, word choice, etc. in a single descriptive passage or significant scene may be enough to fill your two-page target length!  Whatever you decide, your MEs must be grounded in close readinginterpretive analysis of specific passages and scenes.

For fuller details, see the Mini-Essay Assignment Guidelines and the Essay Evaluation Checklist. NOTE: You should familiarize yourself with this checklist before you start to write, and take care to avoid the issues and errors that are included on the Checklist and in the Grading Codes!

POSTING GUIDELINES:  Mini-Essays are due no later than midnight on the Fridays indicated on the Calendar of Assignments. The text of your Mini-Essays must be pasted into the message field of your Discussion Group posting so that classmates can respond to it in a Discussion thread.  Additionally, you must attach your ME as a .docx file so that I can easily access the first draft of the MEs submitted for a grade and evaluate the changes made during the revision process. 

-- IMPORTANT: in order to receive credit for each ME, you must post at least two short (but thoughtful) Classmate responses [= "CRs"] to MEs posted by two members of your Polylearn Discussion Group (with whom you may agree or disagree, as long as you do so respectfully and back up your response with your own textual support).  CRs must including at least one ADDITIONAL quotation from the text (i.e. a quotation that was not included in the ME to which you are responding) in support of your observations.  CRs are due no later than midnight on the Sundays indicated on the Calendar of Assignments.

Your twelve CRs submitted over the course of the quarter will not be graded as Written Work, but they are required to get credit for your six ungraded ME postings AND for the graded paper; additionally, CRs, like MEs, factor into the Participation, Intellectual Engagement and Collaboration component of your final course grade. You must post two CRs to receive credit for each of your MEs. Each missing ME and each missing CR counts as an Unexcused Absence.


GRADED WRITING ASSIGNMENT


Because effective writing is the result of an ongoing process of revision, the three-page Paper you submit for a grade should be a carefully edited revision/expansion of an ME submitted to your PolyLearn discussion group; it must cover substantial new ground and should be 50% longer (three pages) than your initial 2-page ME posting. (Even the strongest writing can be improved through the revision process.) 

To allow time for thoughtful revision and careful editing, hard copy of an ME submitted for a grade will not be accepted earlier than a week after CRs have been posted.  Students are encouraged to discuss their ideas with Dr. Schwartz during an office hour, take a draft of their ME to the University Writing Center, and/or get additional feedback from a friend or classmate who is familiar with the conventions of writing about literature (or who has read and understands those conventions, as articulated in the ME Guidelines, the Paper Guidelines formerly used for the final paper in ENGL 380, and the Essay Evaluation Checklist) prior to submitting the revised ME for grading.

-- ONE of your two-page Mini-Essays will be revised and expanded to a three-page graded paper which must be turned in in hard copy, along with a hard-copy print-out of the original ME that has been peer-edited by another member of your Discussion Group.  This carefully edited revision/expansion is worth  15% of your course grade.  To allow time for careful revision and editing, the revised/expanded ME submitted for grading must be submitted at least one week after Classmate responses have been posted. The header for the revision should begin "Revised ME #: Title." 

-- scribe at workIMPORTANT: in order to receive credit for your Mini-Essays, you must post at least two short (but thoughtful) Classmate Responses [= "CR"] to the MEs posted by two other members of your Polylearn Discussion Group (with whom you may agree or disagree, as long as you do so respectfully and back up your response with your own textual support from the play).  CRs must including at least one ADDITIONAL quotation from the play (that was not cited in the ME to which you are responding) in support of your observations.  Classmate responses are due no later than midnight on the the dates indicated on the Calendar of Assignments (generally, 2 days after Mini-Essays are due). 

Your twelve classmate responses will not be graded as Written Work, but they are required to get credit for your Graded Paper and they factor into the Participation, Intellectual Engagement, and Collaboration component of your final course grade:  each missing Classmate Response counts as an Unexcused Absence.  Additionally, your peer-editing of the first draft of the essay revised and submitted for credit by another member of your Discussion Group is REQUIRED; failure to peer-edit the ME of ONE member of your Discussion Group WILL COUNT AS AN UNEXCUSED ABSENCE

There are two Peer-Editing assignments (which each student must complete for ONE other member of her/his Discussion Group). The first is "dry-run" peer edit of ME 1 which ALL students will complete and turn in to Dr. Schwartz.  The second, "official" Peer Edit will be completed for a classmate as part of her/his revision process prior to submitting her/his expanded/revised paper for a grade.  Both Peer Edits require the Peer Editor to fill out a hard copy print-out of the Essay Evaluation Checklist available as a printer-friendly document on Polylearn (a print-out of the Essay Evaluation Checklist webpage will not be accepted); to write corrections and editing suggestions on the first draft of the ME under revision using the Error Codes at the bottom of the Essay Evaluation Checklist; to CIRCLE on that checklist ALL error codes used in peer-editing the first draft ME; and to  write an end comment that points to strengths and/or weaknesses of the ME and provides at least one suggestion for what new material to include while expanding the paper to three pages.

On the front of the hard-copy check-list, the Peer Editor's name must be clearly indicated ("Feedback by NAME") along with the name of the person whose ME is being responded to ("Feedback to NAME"); also indicate your Discussion Group number.  If the names are not included, the Peer Editor will not receive credit for this required assignment.

On the front of the hard-copy check-list, the Peer Editor's name must be clearly indicated ("Feedback by NAME") along with the name of the person whose ME is being responded to ("Feeback to NAME"); also indicate your Discussion Group number.  If the names are not included, the Peer Editor will not receive credit for this required assignment.

Your Graded paper counts for 15% of your final course grade

Because revised MEs will not be accepted earlier than a week after CRs have been posted, students choosing to revise an ME submitted in weeks 8 or 9 may not have finished their revisions by the final class meeting.  In that case, the revised ME should be submitted as a .docx (or .doc) file sent as an email attachment. 

An ME submitted for grading via email at the end of the quarter MUST:


EXAMS will cover readings, lectures, and required films. Both exams will include an essay on which you may try for GWR certification.  Essays will be worth 50% of exam points; the remaining 50% will be for the objective portions of the exam.  Expect factual questions (T/F, matching, multiple choice) about assigned works (including required critical essays and background readings) and key concepts covered in lectures and background materials. There will also be Passage IDs and possibly Item IDS:  choosing from a list of key names, objects, motifs and/or episodes, you will identify the work(s) in which the item appears and explain its role and significance in each of these works.  The Final Exam will be semi-cumulative, but with emphasis on material covered since the Midterm exam. FINAL EXAM TIME: The three-hour, closed-book Final Exam will take place on T 3/22/18, from 4:10- 7:00 PM. You must take the exam at the scheduled time.  KEEP THIS DATE IN MIND WHEN MAKING END-OF-QUARTER TRAVEL PLANS!
 
 

John
          Waterhouse, Tristram and Isolde Sharing the Potion (1916)Edward
          Burne-Jones, King Marc and La Belle Iseult (1862)William Morris,
          Guinevere or La Belle Iseult (1858)N.C. Wyeth, King Mark Slew the Noble Knight Sir Tristram
          (1917; illustration from Sidney Lanier's The Boy's King
          Arthur)

COURSE GRADE CALCULATION:  20%: Intellectual Engagement and Collaboration (more concrete than the general term "participation"), based on class attendance (20 class meetings); 2 (ungraded) peer-edits of a classmate's ME (all students will submit a peer-edit for ME 1; each student will submit a peer-edit of ONE other ME that a classmate is revising as his or her final, graded paper); and the following ungraded submissions to the assigned Discussion Group forum: 6 (ungraded) MEs, 12 (ungraded) Classmate Responses, and 5 (ungraded) video worksheets

15%: quizzes
 (lowest score dropped).  If quiz average is more than 6 pts., a bonus of .05 to .3 will be added to the normally top score of 4.0.  (4.0=A, 3.7=A-, 3.3=B+, etc., as in computing GPA)

15%:
 Graded Revision and Expansion to Three Pages of ONE 2-page Polyearn Discussion Group Mini-Essay. Your carefully edited, revised and expanded paper may NOT be identical to your initial ME posting ; you must cover significant new ground in the additional page of the essay.  To receive credit for the graded, revised ME, you must turn it in along with hard copy of the original 2-page ME posting, which must be peer-edited by one other Discussion Group member.  Peer-editing requires: 1) written corrections and notations on the hard copy ME, using the grading codes on the Essay Evaluation Checklist posted on PolyLearn; 2) a final comment addressing strengths of the ME and offering at least one suggestion for revision/improvement; and 3) filled out hard copy of the Essay Evaluation Checklist (.PDF file available on PolyLearn).  Be sure that the name of both the essay writer and the Peer Editor is found on BOTH the hard copy of the first draft ME AND the Essay Evaluation Checklist filled out by the Peer Editor.
 

20% Intellectual Engagement and Collaboration (more concrete than the general term "participation"), based on class attendance (20 class meetings); 2 (ungraded) peer-edits of a classmate's ME (all students will submit a peer-edit for ME 1; each student will submit a peer-edit of ONE other ME that a classmate is revising as his or her final, graded paper); and the following ungraded submissions to the assigned Discussion Group forum: 6 (ungraded) Mini-Essays, 12 (ungraded) Classmate Responses, and 5 (ungraded) Video Worksheets.
15% Quizzes (for quiz score calculation, please see note below!)
15% One three-page graded paper, a Revision/Expansion of ONE PolyLearn Discussion Group Mini-Essay. Your carefully edited, revised and expanded paper may NOT be identical to your initial ME posting; because the target length is 50% longer than the originally posted ME, you must cover significant new ground in the additional page of the essay.  To receive credit for the graded, revised ME, you must turn it in along with hard copy of the original 2-page ME posting, which must be peer-edited by one other Discussion Group member.  Peer-editing requires: 1) written corrections and notations on the hard copy ME, using the grading codes on the Essay Evaluation Checklist posted on PolyLearn; 2) a filled out hard copy of the Essay Evaluation Checklist (.PDF file available on PolyLearn); and 3) a final comment addressing strengths of the ME and offering at least one suggestion for revision/improvement (written on the back of the Essay Evaluation Checklist).  Be sure that the name of both the essay writer and the Peer Editor is found on BOTH the hard copy of the first draft ME AND the Essay Evaluation Checklist filled out by the Peer Editor.
20%
Midterm Exam (100-pt. Objective Exam and 100-pt. Essay)
30% Final Exam (150-pt. semi-cumulative Objective Exam and 150-pt. Essay)
Note 1: Because this is a C4 writing-intensive course, 50% of points on each exam are for the essay. 
Note 2:
The Exams component of final course grade will be calculated by adding together the total number of pts. earned on the Midterm and Final Exams and dividing by 500, the total number of exam pts. 

A NOTE ON QUIZ SCORES:  Remember that quiz points and exam points are not equivalent, since the percent scores awarded on quizzes have been artificially inflated (an average of 10 correct answers on quizzes with 15-20 questions is recorded as a quiz score of "100%" rather than the actual percent score, 66% or below).  A score of  100% on a 100-pt. objective midterm means 100 of 100 exam questions are correct, while "100%" on a "10-pt." quiz means 10 of 15-20 quiz questions are correct -- and quizzes are worth significantly less than exams. 

You therefore cannot calculate your final course grade directly from the raw percentage grades earned on quizzes and exams.  For this reason (and also because so many students finish the quarter with quiz averages above "100%"!), I convert the scores on all components of the class to a 4.0-scale (4.3=A+, 4.0=A, 3.7=A-, 3.3=B+, etc.) before calculating the final course grade.

Everyone
whose quiz average is more than 10 pts. per quiz will receive a bonus in the form of a quiz grade of above the normal maximum grade of 4.0.  The amount of this bonus (from .05 to .3) will be commensurate with the strength of the quiz average relative to other students in the class.


Mac
        Harshberger, Tristan adrift, illustration for Bedier's Tristan
        and Isolde (New York: Albert & Charles Boni, 1927)OH MY GOSH . . . CAN I HANDLE THIS CLASS??

Sure you can -- if you do the readings!  Because not all readings are equally long, look ahead to plan your time.  Finally. . . remember that I LOVE teaching this stuff, and I'm told that my enthusisam makes my classes more fun.

And WHAT ABOUT THOSE TWO-HOUR BLOCKS?

Rest assured, we'll take a break each day.  Feel free to bring along a caffeinated (or non-caffeinated) drink -- whatever it takes to keep you alert through two hours.  If there is sufficient interest, rotating cookie duty can be arranged!

WELCOME, AND ENJOY!!!


 



A Note on Academic Integrity: 

Cheating
includes (but is not limited to) sharing or discussion of quiz passages or exam questions with students who have not yet taken a quiz or exam; making copies of materials that are not allowed to circulate (e.g. graded or ungraded exams); or any other use of course materials from a previous quarter that gives you an advantage over other students without your Instructor's knowledge and explicit permission.  Incidents of Cheating will be reported to the Office of Academic Affairs and may result in a Failing Grade.

Plagiarism is a serious offense.  I expect that you understand what constitutes plagiarism and how to correctly use and cite information in your papers.  In its most basic definition, plagiarism means 1) passing off someone else's work as your own or 2) taking ideas and/or words from others without properly citing them. 

In this class, you may refer to ideas or concepts defined in lectures and on my web pages without citing the lectures and web pages explicitly, since I consider that information and these concepts to be "yours" to use freely (provided that you do not copy language directly from my pages).
The writing assignments in this class should cite ONLY the Shakespeare's texts, not secondary sources or critics. Both ungraded MEs and the graded ME revision/expansion paper should cite only the play itself and offer arguments grounded in close reading of the text.  It is unlikely that students who adhere to these guidelines might inadvertently commit plagiarism in this class. 

I strongly recommend that you do NOT consult other online resources for "help" as you grapple with these texts, since in my experience, students using these sites have been most prone to inadvertent (and occasionally deliberate) plagiarism.  If you DO consult such materials, you MUST list these resources in a "Works Consulted" section of your ME or graded Paper.  Please note that a Work Consulted listing, along with the normal Work Cited listing, will cut significantly into the already limited room you have to make your argument (no more than 2 pp. for an ME or 3 pp. for the revised/expanded graded paper).  It is to your advantage to complete the assignments as they are intended; the online resources you may find will not typically help you complete these assignments successfully, and the consequences of even inadvertent plagiarism are high.

That said, if you are unsure of how to avoid plagiarism in your papers, you should talk to me before you turn in the paper.  Turning in a writing assignment completed in whole or in part by another individual, or adapted from another individual's work, is plagiarismIf you are caught plagiarizing in this course, you will fail the course and you may be expelled from the university.  Finally, you may not turn in a paper you completed for another class for credit in this class; similarly, you cannot turn in work completed in this class for credit in any other class without obtaining express permission from that professor. 

For your convenience, I am including below the language from Cal Poly's Academic Integrity policy (CAP 681; see <http://www.osrr.calpoly.edu/plagiarism/> ):

"Cal Poly will not tolerate academic cheating or plagiarism in any formAcademic dishonesty is addressed both as an academic issue and as a disciplinary incident under the CSU Standards for Student Conduct.  [. . .] Plagiarism is defined as the act of using intentionally or unintentionally the ideas or work of another person or persons as if they were one�s own without giving proper credit to the source. Such an act is not plagiarism if it is ascertained that the ideas were arrived through independent reasoning or logic, or where the thought or idea is common knowledge. Acknowledgement of an original author or source must be made through appropriate references, i.e., quotation marks, footnotes, or commentary.  Examples of plagiarism include, but are not limited to, the following: the submission of a work, either in part or in whole, completed by another; failure to give credit for ideas, statements, facts or conclusions which rightfully belong to another; failure to use quotation marks [. . .] when quoting directly from another, whether it be a paragraph, a sentence, or even a part thereof; close and lengthy paraphrasing of another�s writing without credit or originality; and use of another�s [paper], project or [. . . ] part thereof without giving credit. Submitting the same project to multiple instructors as a unique creation may also be considered plagiarism. A project produced for another class must be cited just as when citing any other source. Prior to resubmitting work from a previous course, a student must receive explicit written permission from the instructor of the current course. A project produced for another class must also be cited just as when citing any other source."

Additionally, you should be aware that sharing information about reading quizzes and/or exams with students who have not yet completed the quiz or exam is a violation of Cal Poly's rules concerning Academic IntegrityIf you are caught sharing information about quiz or exam questions, you will fail the course and you may be expelled from the university.

 

Contents of this and all linked pages Copyright Debora B. Schwartz, 2004-2018

 
detail, Mac Harshberger, Tristan
        drinks the cup, illustration for Bedier's Tristan and Isolde
        (New York: Albert & Charles Boni, 1927)
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